In the wake of emissions scandal, the German marque is looking to become an industry leader on environmental issues
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The Volkswagen Group is on the lookout for a young climate change campaigner to “aggressively” aid and facilitate the marque’s environmental initiatives, as reported by the Financial Times.

Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess believes the company is hindered by internal bureaucracy and is slow to react in the shift towards electric vehicles.

“We have so many ideas,” Mr Diess said. “But they take too long to implement in our big organisation, so I need someone really aggressive internally.”

Mr Diess plans to allow the climate activist direct access to himself and other top Volkswagen executives to support the marque’s commitment to invest AU$19.5 billion into electric vehicle technology each year.

Volkswagen hopes to surpass Tesla and other electric vehicle producers by selling one-million emissions-free cars by 2023 and 26 million by the end of 2029.

The brand’s electric ID.3 – a Golf-sized full-electric vehicle – is due in Australia in 2022/23, and its subsidiary Porsche’s electric Taycan 4S is set for arrival later this year.

A rush towards greener vehicles is a focus of Volkswagen’s in the wake of its ‘dieselgate’ scandal.

The 2015 emissions scandal saw over 11 million of its turbocharged diesel engines receive software that would mask NOX values during test conditions but produce much higher values in real-world driving.

Last week, Volkswagen was ordered by a German court to pay $1.34 billion in compensation to buyers affected, following a string of compensation settlements and fines applied to the marque since the scandal.

Dieselgate has reportedly cost the marque about the same as what they have invested into zero-emission vehicles since.