Rather than relying on a raft of tacked-on pieces of equipment, the system integrates everything into the car's infotainment system.

Kia and Fujitsu Australia have teamed up to develop a cleaner interface for emergency service vehicles. Rather than relying on bulky, tacked-on instruments, the system integrates into Kia's existing infotainment system.

Based on a Stinger, the car pictured here relies on a Fujitsu software platform (which appears to have its roots in Google's Android platform) that pulls disparate technologies like active numberplate recognition, sirens and internal messaging into the one interface.

According to the development team, that helps eliminate a number of issues common in emergency vehicles. Without bulky add-on gear scattered around the cabin, there's no issue with airbag firing and air-conditioning vent placement, and officers have more space in the cabin.

Top: A current police Stinger. Bottom: The standard Stinger cabin, which would be maintained with the new system.

According to Kia, the switch to a fully-integrated system will remove the need for officers to login to seven different systems. With less copper wiring, cars can be lighter and draw less power as well.

"Fujitsu’s goal was to develop a car that looked like a regular vehicle rather than a highly modified police car. By integrating systems into the inbuilt systems in the vehicle, we were able to remove excess bracketry inside the cabin," said Ian Hamer, principal architect at Fujitsu.

The concept car pictured here has its radar integrated into the car's dashboard display, and there are plans to allow the car to automatically detect stolen cars by their make, model and colour. Kia also says the tech will be able to tell if someone has pulled a weapon and send a duress signal.

At the moment, the system is just in the concept phase, but Fujitsu is looking to commercialise it.