Board member for Czech manufacturer says a performance version of the upcoming small car is on the cards, though nothing is concrete at this stage.
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The new Scala hatchback could be the next model in the Skoda line-up to get the sporty RS treatment, according to a new report out of the UK.

Speaking with Auto Express, Skoda's board member "with responsibility" for sales and marketing, Alain Favey, said that a Scala RS isn't confirmed for production just yet, but is under consideration.

"Officially we have not decided anything, but, yes, we are considering a Scala vRS," he said.

"As far as I am concerned, it would make sense for us to have one."

"The reality is that we have been extremely successful with the Octavia vRS. And early signs for the Kodiaq vRS are encouraging; it is hitting its targets and more. So even in a package which is not a conventional sports car, a sporty version makes a lot of sense," he continued.

"On a personal level, I would love to have [it]. But it needs to make sense in terms of profitability and it has to exist in the context of the CO2 targets we have to achieve for next year."

"There are a number of elements that you have to take into consideration – more than there used to be some years ago."

We already have a rough idea on what a Scala RS would look like, given the new hatchback was previewed by the sporty Vision RS concept (pictured), which incidentally featured a petrol-electric plug-in hybrid powertrain.

The Vision RS paired the company's familiar 110kW 1.5 TSI turbo petrol engine with a 75kW electric motor and 13kWh lithium-ion battery pack, with drive sent to the front wheels via a six-speed dual-clutch automatic.

According to Skoda, the concept is capable of hitting 100km/h from a standstill in 7.1 seconds, and hit a top speed of 210km/h. It can also drive up to 70km on electric power alone, and has a combined fuel consumption claim of just 1.4L/100km.

Bernhard Maier, Skoda's CEO, told Auto Express the high take-up of RS models is leading the company to seriously look into new avenues like electrification.

"in several countries the vRS take rate on Kodiaq is north of 20 per cent already. This motivates us to think of other vehicles as well, but we know in this transformational stage, of combustion engines to electro-mobility, we have to think of a new idea of a vRS," he said.

"That's why we showed Vision RS. We’re thinking and deliberating about it."