Lacquer? Where this Koenigsegg is going, it doesn't need lacquer...

Koenigsegg has revealed its latest special-edition Regera, touting its high-tech new carbon exterior finish.

The KNC, or Koenigsegg Naked Carbon, finish involved no lacquer, varnish or alternative coating. Instead, the thin layer of epoxy usually used to coat a cured piece of carbon is gently hand-removed until only the naked carbon remains.

According to Koenigsegg, the result is a "striking new look" for carbon fibre, the lack of any insulating coating or lacquer leaving the Regera's body "cold to the touch".

"The sheen takes on a more metallic graphite appearance as each graphite strand is now fully exposed," the company said in a release.

This isn't the first time Koenigsegg has used the KNC process. It's been applying it to wheels, wings, splitters and steering wheels before finally pulling the trigger on a complete exterior.

The KNC process has been tested in blazing heat and the Scandinavian winter, with its creators suggesting it's actually more resistant to stone chips than conventionally-finished surfaces. It's also lighter – 20kg lighter, in fact – than a car finished with a top-coat or lacquer.

As for how it works? We'll let Koenigsegg explain the process in more detail:

"Most under-hood and interior parts have their epoxy layer removed and are then polished to a raw carbon state; a very delicate process involving both sanding and polishing. The margin for error is extremely fine and can result in either a perfect, high-lustre finish or ruined threads of exposed carbon-fibre."

"It’s not unusual for a customer to specify their car with visible carbon-fibre," said Christian von Koenigsegg, company founder.

"It’s a beautiful material from a visual perspective and our customers love to show what the car is made from. KNC takes the idea of visible carbon-fibre to a whole new level, revealing a beautiful lustre and a very silky finish."

"The Koenigsegg philosophy has always been about exploring extremes," he continued.

"It’s great to extend that idea to a whole new way of finishing and presenting a car.”

The unique finish was created for a Swiss dealership.

Click on the images for more photos by Zero Kache Photography.