A never-registered 1997 McLaren F1 has headed to auction, likely becoming the most valuable F1 auctioned in the process.

The supercar still has the same protective wrapping and interior covers as when it left the factory in Woking, Surrey 20 years ago.

With only 106 units produced between 1992 and 1998, this example is build number 60 and has 239-kilometres on the odometer. McLaren has confirmed those miles were covered as part of pre-delivery factory testing.

When the car was purchased it was exported to Japan, where it was maintained meticulously. The owner has not even sat in the driver's seat.

Now sold, it was predicted to beat another record-breaking F1 from Pebble Beach. It sold for around US$15 million, while others have sold for upwards of US$13 million.

Included in the purchase of the car are McLaren accessories, also still in their wrapping. They include a luggage set, GTR style steering wheel, LM style spare exhaust, passenger over-carpets and a windscreen strip. The most impressive extra – and the rarest – is a Tag Heuer watch with the chassis number inscribed on it.

Tom Hartley Jnr is a high-end car dealer from Derbyshire, and had the task of auctioning the highly collectible car. The company is not revealing the reserve, and hasn't published its final sale price.

The 6.1-litre V12 engine in F1 produces 467kW of power and, astonishingly, still is the world's fastest non-turbocharged internal combustion car in the world – with a top speed of 386 km/h.

McLaren has confirmed a successor to the F1, the BP23 Hyper-GT, is coming in 2019. Just 106 examples will be produced.

We're chasing up how much the car sold for at auction, so stay tuned. Suffice to say, it wasn't cheap.