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by Tim Beissmann

Americans will be forced to pay more for the Chevrolet SS than Australians fork out for its V8-powered Holden VF Commodore SS equivalent, though the US version is the clear value leader of the pair.

Chevrolet has confirmed the SS performance sedan will cost US$44,470 ($45,700) when it goes on sale in the final quarter of 2013, eclipsing the $41,990 starting price of the Commodore SS that launches across Australia this month.

The Chevrolet SS scores a number of unique features to boost its value equation, however, headlined by its larger 6.2-litre ‘LS3’ V8 engine, which produces 310kW of power and 563Nm of torque – up 50kW/46Nm over its Australian counterpart.

The Chevrolet SS is also available exclusively as a six-speed automatic with steering wheel-mounted paddleshifters. The auto box is a $2200 option in the Commodore SS, taking its price to $44,190, though the local unit offers only tiptronic shifting via the gear lever.


In terms of specifications, the sole Chevrolet SS model is equipped more like the $53,690 Holden VF Commodore SS V Redline, coming standard with 19-inch forged aluminium wheels, Brembo front brakes, keyless entry and push-button start, head-up display, side blind zone alert and lane departure warning, automatic parking assist, Bose premium audio system, and a colour touchscreen with rear-view camera, satellite navigation and Chevrolet MyLink.

The pricing positions the Chevrolet SS almost perfectly between the 298kW/555Nm 6.2-litre LS3 V8-powered Chevrolet Camaro 2SS and the all-new 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray with its 343kW/630Nm 6.2-litre LT1 V8, with approximately a US$7500 ($7700) difference either side.

Read CarAdvice’s Holden VF Commodore SS review.