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The European version of the Honda CR-V will this year gain a predictive cruise control system, which is able to brake more smoothly when a car cuts in ahead.

Dubbed Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control, the system uses camera and radar to monitor the position and movement of nearby cars. The CR-V’s computers then calculate the likelihood of each car cutting into the SUV’s lane.

In a car with a regular adaptive cruise control system, the car maintains either the driver set speed or a safe distance to vehicle in front. If another vehicle cuts into the lane, depending on how close it is your car, the adaptive cruise control system may be forced brake suddenly and strongly.

The new Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control, according to Honda, is able to detect a cut-in situation up to five seconds before it happens. Armed with this info, the CR-V is then able to brake more mildly and smoothly than it otherwise would have.

A light in the instrument panel will also flash to inform the driver that the system has detected a cut-in and is in the process of slowing down to maintain a safe distance.

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Honda says the system works regardless of whether you’re driving on the correct side of the road for your type of vehicle. This is an important consideration for European drivers, who are able to drive their left-hand drive cars in the UK. Similarly British drivers are allowed to drive their RHD vehicles on the European mainland.

Unsurprisingly this new piece of technology will initially be limited to top-of-the-range models.

The Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control system was developed teams from both Japan and Europe, but the current algorithm is tuned specifically for European roads and drivers.

We’re waiting to hear back from Honda Australia as to when this predictive cruise control system may appear in Australia.




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