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The first official teaser images of the successor to the Ferrari Enzo – codenamed the Ferrari F150 – have appeared in the Italian sports car maker’s in-house magazine.

The shadowy images give us a clear look at the front and rear styling of the next-generation Maranello hypercar, which is set to once again narrow the gap from road car to Formula One when it is unveiled in the first half of 2013.

The Ferrari F150 features swept headlights reminiscent of the FF and F12 Berlinetta production cars. Sitting on bold haunches, they flank an aggressively contoured bonnet with a central intake and V-shaped creases inspired by the nosecone of an F1 car.

The rear boasts signature circular tail-lights and what appears to be a single centrally mounted exhaust outlet, styled like the brake light of an F1 racer. A ‘double-bubble’ roof is also evident from the rear angle, creating extra room for drivers’ helmets.

The Ferrari F150 will be powered by a hybrid drivetrain combining what’s rumoured to be a 7.3-litre V12 engine with F1-style KERS (kinetic energy recovery system) to potentially produce in excess of 680kW of power. The ‘special limited series’ car should accelerate from 0-100km/h in around 2.5 seconds and have a top speed over more than 350km/h.

Ferrari technical director Roberto Fedeli told the Official Ferrari Magazine the new hypercar’s engine had a lot in common with the company’s F1 cars.

“At Ferrari, F1 and then the special cars are a forecast for our production cars,” Fedeli said.

“The engine in the F150 really isn’t so different to an F1 car.”

Ferrari revealed the F150’s advanced carbonfibre chassis in October, confirming the new tub would be 20 per cent lighter, 22 per cent stiffer and 27 per cent more rigid than that of the Enzo.

Ferrari head of design Flavio Manzoni said the F150 represented the greatest crossover between road cars and F1 in the company’s history.

“We are trying to anticipate the future with this car,” Manzoni said.

“We are trying hard to achieve the technical limit of every single component we are using, and also the packaging of the car as a whole. We are building a car close to the limits of technology, but we will only have succeeded if you can feel the result.

“The real objective of a special Ferrari is feeling, feeling, feeling.”




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