“She’s the last of the V8s. She sucks nitro.”
- shares

Mad Max Rockatansky's Interceptor, featured in the iconic Australian films Mad Max (1979) and Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981), is available for sale in the United States. (We say it should be repatriated, but hey...)

The car is being listed for sale by the Orlando Auto Museum in Florida – which boasts one of the largest collections of movie cars in North America – and it currently has no stated asking price.

(It's worth noting that Australian fans can visit the Mad Max 2 Museum in Silverton, New South Wales, run by an English obsessive who moved here specifically to open a museum in the franchise's homeland.)

The car began its life as a 1973 Ford Falcon XB GT with a 351-cubic-inch (5.8-litre) V8 sending tyre-smoking torque through a four-speed manual transmission.

The Interceptor was then given to stunt driver Murray Smith as payment, after the film exhausted its budget building the car.

Smith reverted the Falcon back to a road-legal condition, which included removal of the through-the-bonnet supercharger that – unfortunately – was only ever a prop.

It received a roadworthy certificate from Victoria Police in 1979 and went up for sale.

However, the Interceptor hadn’t sold by the time Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior entered production and was conscripted for wasteland-vigilante duties yet again.

The car received a tough-love makeover to better reflect the setting of the second film, including the rear firewall being chopped out to fit two huge, extended-range fuel tanks and the Peter Arcadipane-designed 'Concorde' front-end being destroyed.

The rear-end of the car also doubled as living quarters and a workshop for Max and his dog, aptly named ‘Dog’.

After the stunt-use Interceptor was destroyed in the second film’s plot (the stunt car was actually blown up for the scene), only the hero Interceptor remained and was sent to an Adelaide junkyard to be crushed for scrap.

Detroit junkyard owner, Harry Warholak Sr, heard of the Interceptor’s potential fate and arranged purchase, transporting the car over the Pacific. The Falcon changed hands several times in North America before being snatched up by Australian enthusiast Bob Fursenko, who brought it back home in the mid-'80s.

Fursenko installed a new Concorde front and coated the weathered, matte black body in a gloss option – giving the Interceptor a lustre it never had in either of the films in which it appeared.

In terms of the Mad Max films' canon, Fursenko’s changes made the car a combination of styling traits it wore in the films but never at the same time.

The Falcon spent the remainder of the 1980s and early ‘90s touring Australia and being put on display.

In 1992, the Falcon was sold to England’s Cars of the Stars museum in Keswick where it remained for 19 years until the entire collection was sold to South Floridian car collection, the Miami Auto Museum.

Under its ownership, the Miami Auto Museum wanted the car to have greater appeal to its visitors and employed the expertise of custom car-builder Jim Martino (who was building his own Road Warrior-inspired Interceptor at the same time) to bring the car back to life.

Martino accessorised the interior with a voodoo doll dashboard companion, cargo nets, a discarded ‘Fairlane’ badge and even mocked-up empty cans of the fictional ‘Dinki-Di’ dog food that Max and Dog shared in the film.

The Miami Auto Museum has since relocated to Orlando, Florida, where the Interceptor has been listed for sale, however the dealer is remaining tight-lipped on details of the Interceptor.

Fingers crossed that an Australian is willing to bring the car back home.

And then...

Like the idea of patrolling the wasteland in your own MFP Interceptor? Our very own James Ward built a replica during the lead up to 2015's Mad Max: Fury Road movie.

Sadly it's not a matter of just scrounging a piece from here, and a piece from there... you'll need to find a suitable donor car, and a six-figure budget. No one said being a hero was cheap!

More: Everything car culture