Want an XC90 but face assassination on a daily basis? The Armoured is here to protect from bullets and blasts.
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Volvo has unveiled its new XC90 Armoured, a seven-seat crossover capable of surviving a bomb blast.

A project two years in the making, the Armoured is rated for 'VR8' protection. That means it has ballistic protection from every direction, and will protect you against attack from explosives, but it won't stop full copper alloy jacket bullets. If that's a real threat in your life, get yourself a car certified to VR9 level. Or stay indoors.

The windows can be up to 50mm thick, and the steel armour is 10mm thick in places. There's a fire suppression system in the engine bay, and an emergency escape hatch concealed in the boot.

Volvo says all the armouring has been integrated into the body discreetly, meaning it looks just like a regular XC90 from the outside. It's much heavier than a regular XC90, though, weighing in at 4.5 tonnes.

To compensate, the suspension and brakes have been upgraded. Although it's based on the T6 AWD with 235kW and 400Nm, Volvo hasn't detailed how much power the Armoured offers.

"Production is carried out with extreme diligence, which is imperative in order to fulfil the exceptionally high requirements placed on this class of security product. We strive to ensure that the car retains its properties despite the extensive armouring," says Stephan Green, head of marketing at Volvo Special Vehicles.

"The armour is fitted discreetly to make the car barely distinguishable from a standard XC90. Every customer also has their own unique requirements, which we satisfy by means of customised production."

Along with the XC90, Volvo will offer lightly-armoured versions of the XC60. They're expected to be significantly cheaper than the XC90, but won't protect against the same array of assaults. They're predominantly aimed at the Latin American market, according to Volvo.

The XC90 Armoured is available now, priced from £450,000 ($817,700) in the UK. Deliveries will start at the end of 2019, with the majority of cars expected to go to security firms.