A new PHEV variant of medium SUV is the first mainstream electrified model from Opel and Vauxhall, drawing upon PSA underpinnings.
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Opel and Vauxhall have revealed their first-ever mainstream plug-in hybrid, the Grandland X Hybrid4.

Shown here in Vauxhall guise, the crossover PHEV is essentially a re-skinned version of the related Peugeot 3008 GT Hybrid4.

That means there's a 200hp (149kW) 1.6-litre turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine hooked up to a pair of electric motors (109hp/81kW combined) and a 13.2kWh lithium-ion battery pack.

All up the company claims a system power output of 300hp, equivalent to 224kW.

One of the electric motors is coupled to the eight-speed automatic transmission, with the other integrated into the rear axle – making for a dual-motor all-wheel drive system.

The Grandland X Hybrid4 has a claimed EV range of 30 miles (48km) on the WLTP1 cycle, with various charging methods available – 3.3kW on-board as standard, 6.6kW optional.

According to Opel and Vauxhall, customers can fully charge their PHEV SUV in "less than two hours" using the 7.4kW home wallbox.

Other model-specific features compared to the wider Grandland X range offered overseas includes a regenerative braking system – which the companies claim can improve EV range by up to 10% – and a new infotainment system that's compatible with a smartphone app so owners can remotely access key data.

The Grandland X Hybrid4 is the first step in Opel and Vauxhall's electrification strategy, which aims to electrify every model in its line-up by 2024.

Later this year the two brands (now owned by the PSA Group) will release an all-electric version of the next-gen Corsa light hatch, which will share its underpinnings with the new Peugeot 208 and e-208, along with EV versions of the Vivaro Life, Vivaro van, and replacement for the Mokka X compact SUV.

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