The Victorian-based maker of trucks, vans and minibuses is looking to the USA as the next step in its expansion.

SEA Electric is taking its Australian EV-making talents abroad, preparing two pure-electric trucks and a van for the American market.

Based on Ford and Isuzu chassis, and set for display at the Work Truck Show in Indianapolis, the display trucks follow the purchase of a site in Los Angeles, from which it'll explore what's required for North American certification and distribution.

The first truck is based on a Ford F-59 Stripped Chassis, fitted with a battery good for 350km of range. Continuous power from the motor is 150kW, and continuous torque is 1230Nm, but peak power and torque are actually 250kW and 2500Nm respectively.

The second is a Pantech-bodied Isuzu NRR, and features the same powertrain, with the same 350km claimed range. As with the Ford, it can be charged in between four and six hours with a 20kW on-board charger.

Finally, an adapted Ford Transit van will be put on show in Indianapolis, with a range of 350km, peak power of 134kW and max torque of 700Nm.

“We see a lot of opportunities in the States, it’s an extremely large commercial vehicle market with a strong interest in sustainability – the US is an important part of our growth plans,” said Tony Fairweather, SEA Electric Group managing director.

“The country’s high urbanisation and sprawling cities also provide conditions where EV can deliver operators a lot of efficiency gains, not to mention the obvious environmental benefits."

SEA Electric is based in Victoria's LaTrobe Valley. The Victorian Government is helping fund its new factory at an old coal plant, which will have an initial production capacity of 2400 vehicles annually.

Locally, it offers two vehicles: a delivery van, and a 15-seat minibus. Power in both comes from a 70kW/340Nm motor capable of pushing the E4V and E4B to 50km/h in around five seconds.

Top speed is limited to 100km/h, while the 70kWh battery is reportedly good for 320km with a 650kg payload. Charging takes around four hours on a fast three-phase connector, or 'overnight' on a regular 240V port.