A new study by Canada's Alberta Transportation Department has found male motorists are more likely to speed than their female counterparts.
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The study found that of the 1.3 million speeding fines issued in the Provence between 2004 and 2008, 70 per cent of all infringements issued were to men.

Police in Alberta have echoed the sentiment of Australian police in recent times saying younger drivers are also over represented when it comes to speeding fines.

"It seemed like 20- and 21-year-olds were the group that was responsible for the significant amount of speeding convictions," said Alberta Transportation spokesperson, Paul Oss.

In Alberta, police rely heavily on regular speeding crackdowns and hand-held radar guns to stop lead-footed drivers. Fixed and mobile speed cameras not yet common in the region.

"You do feel sometimes you are banging your head against a wall for the fact that sometimes you do have repeat offenders," says Constable Make Hagen, Calgary Police.

The study also found that during the four-year period, speeding offences increased by 46 per cent. Police say the results indicate enforcement programs are having an effect.

Edmonton doctor, Louis Frencescutti of the Injury Prevention Centre, argues that speeding fines should be higher, with irresponsible drivers held more accountable for sharing road trauma-related health care costs.

"Why should the rest of us pay for the stupidity of some," asks Dr. Frencescutti.

Officials with the Alberta Transportation Department say the results show motorists need to be made more aware of the impact speeding plays on road safety and that it must work harder to improve driver habits.

In a bid to step-up its enforcement of road safety, Alberta Police will also introduce aerial speed patrols over the coming weeks in a bid to crackdown on speeding motorists.

Let us know what you think: Are particular groups of people more likely to speed than others? Leave a comment now.