News & ReviewsLast 7 days
Car Advice


by Mark Trueno

It’s not everyday you see a modified Rolls Royce, but when you do…

On the front of the Rolls-Royce there has been an intercooler mounted out in front of it. If that doesn’t give you a hint as to what’s coming, just look a little further back, where the long, expansive hood has been sliced up to make room for the pipes running from said intercooler to the carburettor-fed engine.

Bolted to the other end of the intercooler, the piping that sends the air from the turbocharger into the aforementioned intercooler and engine.

Moving to the back, there’s an intake, but this is a totally different type of intake. This one is more like what might be found on an aircraft. You see, the radiator had to be relocated to make room for the turbo setup, so where better to move it than the trunk.

Of course, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out there’s no airflow in the trunk, and that’s kind of a key factor in having a radiator effectively radiate. That’s where the intake comes in.

The rear fender has been modified to assure air flows through to the radiator.

The modifications consist of a large hole cut into the side of the rear quarter panel with a large boxy scoops, that scoops air from the outside and blows in down through a custom duct and over the radiator.

Beneath the radiator lies a large fuel cell that hangs precariously beneath the trunk, only carrying enough gas to send the car a few miles down the road to the next filling station.






SHARE THIS ARTICLE