• Comfort and refinement; sharply priced; cabin roominess; value for money; appealing design inside and out
  • Workmanlike engine; no proper climate control; short-stacked five-speed manual only; rear drum brakes

OUR RATING
7 / 10



Holden Trax Review
Holden Trax Review
Holden Trax Review
by Curt Dupriez

Current wisdom at Fisherman’s Bend is that it will need far more stock of the new Holden Trax than the “few hundred” units en-route from South Korea for the pint-sized SUV’s local September release. And after a quick spin in the diminutive imported five-door “Mum’s taxi” – Holden’s words, not ours – we’re inclined to wholeheartedly agree.

Right car, right time, says GM’s local arm. Sure enough, the Holden Trax that fits neatly under the Captiva, in both sizing and pricing, lands right under the broad “small SUV” umbrella, a segment increasingly murky in absolute categorisation (define ‘small’) but a certifiably bankable one with a car that ticks the right boxes.

Initial impressions are that the Trax lands big ticks in the most crucial areas for buyers of affordable family-hauling: pricing, value for money, design, new-school technology (at least in the touch-feely infotainment department) and perceived utility.

The range kick-off of $23,490 for the LS manual variant – LS automatic is $25,690, range-topping LTZ is $27,990 – is so sharp that it’s easy to write the Trax off as cheap-yet-cheerless motoring. Far from it.

The Trax’s exterior design strikes a real sweet spot. It looks larger than you’d expect a vehicle based off the Barina’s ‘Gamma’ platform. It’s better resolved and more sweetly proportioned in the metal than it does in pictures. Crucially, size-wise, it’s big enough for that requisite on-road SUV swagger yet small enough to avoid intimidation when tackling ultra-tight parking spaces.

Holden Trax Review
Holden Trax Review
Holden Trax Review
Holden Trax Review

It foregoes its Opel Mokka twin’s cutesier look (with which it only shares its front doors) and has adopted more masculine Chevrolet design (which only differs from the Holden in front grille and bar styling). The look neatly avoids any negative age or gender centricity.

Inside, there’s ample overall headroom and second-row knee room to accommodate four large adults with genuine comfort, though limited cabin width makes fife adults a real stretch of the friendship.

The seating, too, is as supportive as it is comfortable, with cloth trim in the LS and nicely supple Sportec synthetic leather in the LTZ. The front seats, located some 160mm higher that a those in a Cruze, provide the all-important captain’s chair vibe SUV-alike buyers desire.

Design- and material-wise, it presents well. Holden name-checks Steve Jobs – he of Apple fame – with a trend towards a more minimalist approach to the user interface. The perception, at least, is that much of the car’s conveniences and functionality are accessed via the standard-fitment seven-inch touchscreen, and that the only other separate controls necessary are those for the basic air-con (there’s no proper climate control, even on the LTZ pictured below).

The MyLink system display has a rich look – superior to many big-dollar prestige cars, in fact – and straightforward interface for accesses audio, Bluetooth and a host of smartphone (iOS and Android compatible) app-driven features such as Pandora, Tunein, BringoGo sat-nav and Stitcher. There’s no CD player – a deal-breaker, perhaps, for some – though a handy 240-volt/150-watt power outlet is fitted at the rear of the centre console.

Less successful is the instrument cluster – a modern-look analogue tachometer unhappily mated to a clunky, 1980s-look digital display used for speed and other readout information.

Overall, the cabin avoids the sort of youth-themed pretensions found in far too many small, affordable new cars.

Cargo space is a modest 356 litres with the seats up (785 litres seats folded), about par for the sub-compact SUV course and similar to that of your average hatchback. Whether that’s large enough to accommodate the larger prams and ever-growing addenda a modern young family ‘needs’ to cart around is questionable. The utility limitation this brings could well be a deal-breaker for many prospective buyers the Trax is so squarely aimed at.

Nothing about Trax feels cut-priced or low-rent. Fortuitous, for Holden, is GM cousin Opel’s sudden and timely exit from the Aussie market, which neatly and conveniently removes a more highly specified and more premium-priced alternative in the Trax’s (now stillborn) GM cousin, the Mokka. That the Trax comes fitted with a fairly rudimentary powertrain package – at least compared with Chevrolet/Buick/Opel versions offered overseas – will be lost on many buyers. But rudimentary it is.

All three Trax variants come fitted with the same naturally aspirated 1.8-litre petrol four that, head and valves apart, is identical to that of the MY14 Cruze’s engine. Critical stats are 103kW at 6300rpm, 175Nm at a fairly lofty 3800rpm and a combined cycle fuel consumption best of 7.0L/100km for the manual (7.6 for auto variants). One size fits all, then.

The 1.8 delivers its goods in a workmanlike manner. It neither struggles terribly, even with three adults and luggage on board, nor presents anything like spirited enthusiasm. Backed by the auto it’s a handy rather than impressive daily-driven ally. And while the five-speed manual presents a little more tangible engagement to the driver, it’s geared for around-town tractability rather than open-road cruising – nearly 3000rpm in top gear at just 100km/h anyone…?

Not on offer, nor (openly) slated for future rollout, are the 103kW/200Nm 1.4-litre turbocharged four-cylinder petrol or the 96kW/300Nm 1.7-litre turbo-diesel you invariably find behind other GM badges abroad (and was most certainly ear-marked for Opel Mokka in Oz). Also not offered, it should be added, is the super-frugal 85kW/155Nm 1.6-litre naturally aspirated four-cylinder released in Europe. All of these engines better the local 1.8’s consumption figure, too – from 4.5L to 6.4L/100km – even in all-wheel-drive forms. The Holden version, though, is only available in front-wheel drive.

On the road, the Trax really starts punching higher than its modest price tag suggests. It’s quiet, refined and has good isolation from the outside world. Again, there’s a sense of quality that belies the price tags.

Holden engineers know a thing or three about tuning chassis for often dodgy local conditions and the Oz-specified package is a very polished one, with a well-honed ride and handling balance that must surely be a new budget-SUV benchmark. The ride comfort on the LS’s 16s is superb, on the LTZ’s 18s firm yet generally compliant, though a little fidgety from the rear seat.

The no-brainer trade-off, of course, is that the LTZ exhibits a noticeably crisper edge in its handling character. It’s no sports car – far from it – but the Trax does possess a genuine keenness in the corners. Mid-corner bump control and an unobtrusive, driver-friendly stability control calibration deserve special mention. There’s proper depth to the driving experience beyond being simply a utilitarian SUV box on wheels.

More critical than dynamic handling talent for a Mum’s Taxi is safe, surefooted grip and road-holding. Holden specifies top-notch Continental rubber – 205/70R 16-inchers for the LS, 215/55R 18-inchers for the LTZ – which contributes significantly to the Trax’s all-weather, sealed-surface on-road talents.

Brakes, though providing ample, repeatable stopping power, are discs front and drums rear, showing one of the areas where the Trax is engineered to cost. That said, the Trax has six airbags and all essential electronic aids (ESC, ABS, EBD), earning the newcomer a five-star ANCAP rating. Hill-start assist is a welcome standard-fitment feature.

The Trax should rightly be the sales hot cake Holden predicts it will be – mostly down to price and to value for money. And for the latter, the company lists (spec for spec) the pricier Nissan Dualis, Mitsubishi ASX and Hyundai iX35 as key ‘small SUV’ competition.

Thing is, the grey and murky ‘small SUV’ tag conveniently absorbs both sub-compact (Trax, ASX) and compact SUVs (iX35) together with ‘crossovers’ (Dualis). So while it’s easy to say the Trax is more affordable than, say, the Hyundai, it’s also ostensibly one segment smaller in size.

More direct rivals will appear in the not-too-distant future with the Fiesta-based Ford EcoSport, 208-based Peugeot 2008 and Clio-based Renault Captur.

On individual merit, though, the Trax scores enough positives that should see Holden ordering more boat loads.


  Submit an Owner Car Review

HOLDEN TRAX BREAKDOWN

Holden Trax Review
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 8
  Submit an Owner Car Review


  • BP

    While the engine is average at best, everything else about the Trax looks great. I have a feeling Holden will drop a diesel or the 1.4/1.6 turbo from the Cruze into the Trax range in the near future.

    • JT

      Holden looks to have a sure fire winner with this, just what the doctor ordered

      • Robin_Graves

        If you are in the market for a Daewoo Lanos with jacked up suspension. Should get the award for the most tacky interior, oh wait, the Barina spark / Daewoo Matiz already won that.

        • Igomi Watabi

          Did you just wake up from a coma, Robin?

        • Zaccy16

          i agree robin, this looks dated and cheap inside and out already! why choice the worst engine out of the lot the 20 year old breathless ecotec 4cyl 1.8, it is horrible in the cruze and will be even worse in this! but because holden has been glued on it will sell in aus because people think it is aussie made when it is actually built in korea

          • Igomi Watabi

            Nobody thinks that!

          • Zaccy16

            they do, ask around at people who don’t know anything about cars and they will think that all holdens are built in aus!

          • Igomi Watabi

            I can’t say I know a single person who thinks that. Not even my 74 year old mum. But, hey, if your mates do, I can’t dispute it.

          • Captain Nemo®™

            Maybe you should look at your beloved VeeDud. Plenty of people think all VeeDuds are still built in Germany. Most folks would be horrified if they knew their Polio or Beetle was cobbled together in Africa & Mexico from the cheapest parts possible.

          • Zaccy16

            i know my polo is made in SA but with german engines and transmissions to VW germany quality standards, SA is a developed country and would have standards unlike korea, thailand, china etc…

          • Captain Nemo®™

            You’re only one person Zaccy, Millions of the “great unwashed” still think all VeeDuds are German made. As for “German quality” do you mean that failure prone clunk-o-rama DSG or TSI hand grenade? diesel injector failures on Passats?

          • Igomi Watabi

            I’m not sure most economic, social and industrial indicators would agree with you that South Korea is not a developed country. And I’m not sure all of them would agree with you that South Africa is.
            Having said that, Captain Nemo’s response illustrates exactly what I am talking about here. Why must discussion of a car’s merits or otherwise sink to the most juvenile of levels on this webpage?!

          • Zaccy16

            south africa is developed, korea is not 3rd world but is not 1st world yet

          • Igomi Watabi

            mm, I don’t know about South Africa. The reason cars are made there is because of their underpaid labour force. And while I’m at it, I usually like to rant about the outdated Cold War term “third world”, but I’ll leave that for now.

          • Captain Nemo®™

            Zaccy maybe if you spent less time trolling on CA you might know Sth Korea is most definitely a 1st world country. A good education system amongst the best in the world, super fast internet and good hospitals to name a few things.

          • Zaccy16

            but i know for a fact that working conditions and workplace safety is no where near a country such as japan

          • Captain Nemo®™

            What has Japan got to do with things? Your previous comment was “South Africa is developed, Korea is not 3rd world but is not 1st world yet” now you have changed the goal posts to include Japan. What happened to Sth Korea vs Sth Africa?

          • Zaccy16

            i was just using another asian country to compare to korea

          • Igomi Watabi

            And what of your comparison with South Africa, a country with huge economic disparities, which the World Bank describes as an upper-middle economy, but as “newly industrialised”, huge health problems and growing unemployment for 15 years. And that’s just from the shallowest of looks at Wikipedia.

    • Sarah

      I have to agree, usually the downfall of the captiva would have made me turn away but this definitely looks like a serious competitor against mitsubishi, nissan etc. Would be great if they upped the engine though

  • JoeR_AUS

    One of the reasons Opel left

    • $29896495

      Exactly

  • Shak

    The diesel and 1.4 will come. Holden didnt initially drop the 1.4 and the 1.6 into the Cruze until they saw a need to lift sales. If the Trax sells in the numbers Holden is predicting, then i dont think they’ll see a need for more models. If they start to see a drop in sales or customers are absolutely clamouring for diesel then they will import it.

  • PeterMs

    That blue. Hmmm. It might grow on me, but I would have thought maybe red, or white, or …not electric blue?

    • Sumpguard

      I love that blue. Several makers do similar and it is personally my favourite colour. But each to their own.

  • Neil_Way

    While this isn’t the car for any enthusiast, it will definitely sell well in the heartland. Low on fuel, roomy, decent looking in person (especially the LTZ one I saw last month) and affordable.

    With no rivals from Ford or Toyota just yet and the possibility of a better marketing strategy than Mitsubishi is capable of throwing together, Holden will move a truckload of them.

    • tim

      Looks very ugly to me

      • Zaccy16

        i agree, it looks horrible IMO, a peugeot 2008 or renault captur look far superior!

        • Igomi Watabi

          Peugeot 2008 Road tests are very positive and it looks really attractive. It’d be my choice if I was ever looking into this market.

          • Zaccy16

            i agree, from uk reviews it looks good

          • Igomi Watabi

            Wheels raved about it, as they are raving about the 208. Good stuff.

  • peddy.d

    I’m sorry but this car along with every other rebadged Daewoo that Holden sells is rubbish. The only thing in their range that is acceptable is the Commodore

    • Igomi Watabi

      They don’t sell re-badged Daewoos. This car is built in a GM factory, like all of Holden’s sub-Commodore cars, and badged accordingly. The Factory does not belong to Daewoo, a company which ostensibly no longer exists. Nor has it existed since before these cars were designed.

      • $29896495

        Actually you are wrong, it’s still called Daewoo in Korea.

        • Golfschwein

          Daewoo still exists, but not in the context of this discussion. No Daewoo badged car has been made since 2011. They are now Chevrolets and can be seen at dub dub dub dot chevrolet dot co dot kay arr.

          • Igomi Watabi

            They are still called Daewoos in Korea, but it is now just a badge. Just like the Chevrolet badge and the Holden badge on these cars (Cruze excepted). Built by the company called General Motors in Korea and badged accordingly.

          • Igomi Watabi

            Sorry, I was responding to huwtm. So they call ‘em Chevrolets in Korea now too?
            I guess the point is, yes, they might still need improving, but the old anti-Daewoo prejudice is outdated and ignorant. The Cruze sits on the same platform as the Astra, with which it even some cabin controls and bits and bobs, as well as the platform. The Malibu sits on the same platform as the Insignia. GM input has raised the standard (albeit with some way still to go) to the point where the anti-Daewoo sentiment is archaic.

          • $29896495

            See below, the name has changed but that’s it. So by right of heritage they are still Daewoos.

          • Golfschwein

            That’s a little like saying that, by right of heritage, Hyundais are rubbish. Or that Lexuses are rebadged Toyotas. I think it’s time to move on and, given you’re a stickler for correctness, acknowledge that Daewoo no longer makes cars. GM Korea does. Those last two sentences are 100% correct.

          • $29896495

            GM Korea (formally known as GM Daewoo) sure. unfortunately you can’t compare them to Hyundai or Kia a look inside them, their dash etc there external design and build quality hasn’t improved as those others have. They are still pretty much as they were. I’m not a Daewoo kicker, just know what they were like. Changing the name doesn’t change that. Lexus is still in many respects a rebadged rebodied in some instances Toyota

      • Zaccy16

        they share many components and still looks as cheaply built as daewoos!

        • Igomi Watabi

          But you miss the point. Daewoo doesn’t exist any more. GM Korea exists and has improved things no end. It doesn’t share anything with any Daewoo, because, as Golfschwein helpfully points out, there is no Daewoo any more. So the Daewoo comparison is getting tired. I’m not saying GM Korea make the world’s best cars or anything, but ffs, give the Daewoo thing a rest. What this blog needs is some people who can helpfully discuss cars’ good and bad points, instead of people trotting out the same old clichés and dissing things for no good reason. Tell me, what do you objectively (without prejudice) think of this car?

          • Zaccy16

            i have already stated my opinion about this car, it looks ugly and cheap inside and out and has a rubbish engine and transmission

          • Igomi Watabi

            I don’t particularly like it myself, but whatever.

          • Igomi Watabi

            “Design- and material-wise, it presents well”

          • $29896495

            Of course the old cliches are going to be trotted out, it is still GM Daewoo, just with a different name. Nothing else has changed. A rose by another name would smell as sweet? Your argument that the name is different is meaningless. It is still the same.

          • Igomi Watabi

            And your argument that manufacturers never evolve is equally meaningless. We’re not all driving around in 48-215s or Model Ts. Where’s your evidence that nothing has changed? Caradvice and Wheels are both positive about this and the Malibu, to mark to recent releases.
            And your “I’m not a Daewoo kicker” is laughable. You certainly are. And the sad thing is, you’re kicking an extinct marque. “You know, I hate Wolseleys. Nothin’ but re-badged Austins!”

          • $29896495

            Hey if you like it great. Pitty you think that about the Worsley. GM Daewoo put a real effort in to be different. They had some nice dash boards and I thought reasonable quality. Engines not so great. When GM propper moved in things took a backward step. I’ve seen a drop in design quality and build quality has not improved since 99.

          • Igomi Watabi

            Actually, back when they were GM Daewoo, the majority of their engines were coming from Fisherman’s Bend until four cylinder plant there closed. I had a Leganza as a 500 buck runabout, and I have to say the dashboard is a dreaful design, trying to be different, but just providing more angles from which the vinyl can peel from its backing.

          • $29896495

            Can’t deny the Leganza dash, was a step to far in trying to make it look luxurious or complicated (not sure which) the outside of the car itself was rather attractive. The lack of longevity of the materials used, especially in our sun was pretty hopeless. But that aside for cars designed to have a three year life on initial purchase they didn’t seem to bad. Then of course, you had the issue of the underpowered, poorly built, old fashioned Holden engines. Which all around the world loved to throw timing belts.

          • Igomi Watabi

            Basically, you are completely wrong about the quality of materials back then and the designs have not stood the test of time. Build quality has improved immensely. My banger is a 2001 model, and it’s quality and fit and finish is abysmal, and the dashboard design is a laughable attempt to be “different”. The engine, A holden built 4, is very economical, but immensely unreliable.But, as said here, the design and materials “present well” on modern GM Korea products these days.

          • $29896495

            see below

          • Igomi Watabi

            I can tell you that the design and quality of Korean Holdens these days are immensely more contemporary and competitive with other marques than they ever were in the old days.
            The exterior design of the Leganza is an interesting one – and basically the reason why I forked out 500 bucks for one. Giugiaro spruiked a design for a smaller Jaguar, which Jaguar rejected, and Giugiaro went on to use that design as the basis for the Leganza. It was at a point in Daewoo’s history where they were starting to look at improvements in their cars. The exterior is very pretty – a success. The interior a dreadful design and dreadful materials. The mechanicals were agricultural.
            Having said that, this old Leganza handles well (local tuning of the suspension in the second generation Leganza) and gets about 7-8 L/100km economy.
            But to suggest that modern GM Korea cars are in any way comparable to this noble but abject failure of a car is just patently ridiculous.

          • Igomi Watabi

            ps – spot-on about the timing belt thing. Mine threw one at 110 resulting in 16 expensive bent valves.

          • Igomi Watabi

            Actually, I’m quite partial to a Wolseley (see spelling), or indeed any weird BMC derivative (Farina-bodied MG Magnette, VanDenPlas 1100, Riley Hornet). But I couldn’t think of an alternative olde-worlde example off the top of my head.
            maybe “Daewoo 1.5i – nothing more than a re-badged Opel Kadett”

          • Igomi Watabi

            Sorry, Riley Elf. It was the Wolseley Hornet.
            (do I have too much evening time on my hands?)

    • Zaccy16

      i agree, i have been saying that for ages, cars like thr horrible trac, captiva, malibu etc.. shows us how bad korean gm cars are comparably to the aussie built VF commodore that is superior in every way!

      • Igomi Watabi

        Yep, the Commodore is an effing good car, and we should be proud of the engineering nous that has gone into it and hope that it turns around sales (it’s doing well) and becomes a big enough success to ensure the future of Australian jobs. But I disagree with the suggestion that GM Korea cars are “bad” per se. The latest Wheels test puts the Malibu behind the 6 but ahead of the Accord – for significantly less ORC. Not bad, considering where GM Korea started. Again, I’m not saying they’re the best cars in the world, but the economies of selling cars in Australia means a company like Holden, given token support by its parent company, doesn’t have a business case for Euro-built cars and so works with GM Korea.
        Also, again, what’s your objective (without prejudice) opinion on the Holden Cruze? It’s “aussie built”.

        • Zaccy16

          the cruze is aussie built but it is built from a korean design, it is cheaply built and heavy and the only decent engine is the opel sourced 1.6 turbo

          • Igomi Watabi

            I disagree on “cheaply built”, but can’t argue on “Korean design”. But that should be a “General Motors design undertaken in Korea”. But then, GM Korea probably do lag behind Kia and Hyundai for finesse of design, if not driving experience. I just think you are being unnecessarily difficult towards these cars for the main reason that they’re not “aussie” enough for you. I will agree with you on the Hungarian-built 1.6 though. It’s a reasonable engine.

  • F1orce

    This thing is geared extremely shortly and its heavier than the Cruze.

    I wonder how the 7L/100km will be achieved?

    1st ratio in the 6-speed auto is 4.584:1

    And has a very short diff ratio of 4.28:1

    There is a reason why the Cruze is always in the wrong gear, it has a very short first gear than the rest are too long. Bad design.

    • Zaccy16

      very bad design, 3000 rpm in top gear at highway speeds is a joke in a new car! it really needs a 6th gear for the manual to spread out the ratios better

  • F1orce

    I’d personally be embarrassed to be driving in an SUV of this size and status.

    • racrepus

      lol It’s not as bad as say a pink Nissan Micra convertible. I think even some women would be embarrassed to be seen in that.

  • Sumpguard

    I think this will be a reasonable seller for Holden. It looks quite good and has a ready made sub 30′s market . I don’t see that drum brakes on the rear of this type of vehicle is a major issue either.

    • Neil_Way

      For the market, it’ll do well. Disappointing vehicle if you actually care about driving of course, but most drivers don’t.

      • Sumpguard

        I certainly wouldn’t buy one. The market will most likely be made up almost entirely of female buyers.

  • J

    It looks like the SsangYong Korando.

    • pol

      Except this one is uglier.

    • Igomi Watabi

      I like the old, agricultural, rough and tumble, actually capable off-road Korando.

  • zahmad

    205/70r16 on the LS? Really? Glad to see some local testing…

  • 42 = The Answer

    Brings back memories of the YG series Holden Cruze. This time though it’s better priced, spec’d and doesn’t look anything like a Suzuki Ignis!

  • Observer

    So, if Holden considers this a ‘small SUV’, what do they consider the Captiva5?

  • gibbut

    that grille and bonnet are ugrhree!!!

  • guest

    Front wheel drive only? Rear drum brakes? Ugh.
    What’s the point?

  • Mr. Magoo

    Why Must Holden continue to adopt Chevrolet design ? Americans never have or will be able to design a car! Yep I’m, aware Holden is owned by GM but Holden need their own Identity and I’d take the Mokka over this as it look way better by a country mile. At least Opel removed the Korean influence.

  • Igomi Watabi

    ah, stereotypes. Bless

Holden Trax Specs

LS : 1.8L MULTI POINT F/INJ - 5 SP MANUAL - UNLEADED PETROL - 4D WAGON
Car Details
Make
HOLDEN
Model
TRAX
Variant
LS
Series
TJ
Year
2013
Body Type
4D WAGON
Seats
5
Engine Specifications
Engine Type
MULTI POINT F/INJ
Engine Size
1.8L
Cylinders
INLINE 4
Max. Torque
175Nm @  3800rpm
Max. Power
103kW @  6300rpm
Pwr:Wgt Ratio
75.1W/kg
Bore & Stroke
80.5x88.2mm
Compression Ratio
10.5
Valve Gear
VARIABLE DOUBLE OVERHEAD CAM
Drivetrain Specifications
Transmission
5 SP MANUAL
Drive Type
FRONT WHEEL DRIVE
Final Drive Ratio
4.63
Fuel Specifications
Fuel Type
UNLEADED PETROL
Fuel Tank Capacity
53
Fuel Consumption (Combined)
7L / 100km
Weight & Measurement
Kerb Weight
1371
Gross Vehicle Weight
Not Provided
Height
1674mm
Length
4278mm
Width
1776mm
Ground Clearance
158mm
Towing Capacity
Brake:1200  Unbrake:500
Steering & Suspension
Steering Type
RACK & PINION - POWER ASSISTED
Turning Circle
10.9
Front Rim Size
6.5x16
Rear Rim Size
6.5x16
Front Tyres
205/70 R16
Rear Tyres
205/70 R16
Wheel Base
2555
Front Track
1540
Rear Track
1540
Front Brakes
DISC - VENTILATED
Rear Brakes
DRUM
Standard Features
Comfort
Air Conditioning
Control & Handling
16 Inch Alloy Wheels, Electronic Brake Force Distribution
Driver
Adjustable Steering Wheel - Tilt & Telescopic, Cruise Control
Interior
Cloth Trim
Safety
Dual Airbag Package, Anti-lock Braking
Security
Central Locking Remote Control
Optional Features
Exterior
Metallic Paint
Other
Service Interval
9 months /  15,000 kms
Warranty
36 months /  100,000 kms
VIN Plate Location
9-H-13
Country of Origin
KOREA