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The updated 2012 Nissan GT-R has once again seen a vast array of improvements over the model it replaces. With 404kW of power (up from 390kW) and 628Nm of torque (up from 612Nm), the almighty GT-R has officially broken the three-second barrier, now catapulting from 0-100km/h in a staggering 2.8 seconds.

That makes it faster than the Ferrari 458, Lamborghini Aventador, Aston Martin DBS and even the Porsche 911 Turbo. Not bad for a Nissan.

The model year 2012 improvements are mostly under the skin but are nonetheless extensive. The engine is enhanced with significantly improved intake and exhaust efficiency, more precise matching of the ports of the intake manifold and cylinder head, new metallic sodium filled exhaust valves and a smaller and lighter underfloor catalyser. Meanwhile the legendary 3.8-litre twin-turbo V6 now runs a leaner air/fuel ratio, optimising the valve and ignition timing. But despite the increase in power and torque (not to mention better acceleration times), fuel usage has actually dropped from 12.0L/100km to 11.7L/100km.

Much like the considerably more expensive supercars it competes against, the Nissan GT-R’s engine is not a mass-produced unit, with only eight people in the world authorised to build the engine. Each VR38DETT engine is built from beginning to end by one of the eight engineers with extreme attention to detail.

The Nissan GT-R’s six-speed dual clutch transmission, which we had criticised in the past for being a little clunky and noisy, has also seen further refinement with a strengthened design of the shift fork arm and a firmer fixing bearing for the flywheel housing. Nissan is also supplying all new GT-R’s with new competition type differential oil (Type 2189E – 75W140).

Specially designed Dunlop SP Sport Maxx tyres are a new addition, while Nissan has improved the body strength with more reinforcement for the engine compartment and dashboard.

On the inside the new Nissan GT-R is pretty much identical to the 2011 model, except for the addition of blue lighting inside the tachometer ring to match the shift position indicator light and a rear view camera, which is now standard. Audiophiles will be pleased that Nissan Australia has elected to take the Bose precision sound system woofers that were built for the EGOIST grade GT-R (not available in Australia), which means the door speakers and woofer in the centre rear are now mounted on a solid aluminium die cast panel for less vibration.

Now you may be thinking that all these changes are going to add a fair bit to the price. Not so, the price increase for the 2012 Nissan GT-R is a mere $2000. For $170,800 you can buy a supercar capable of playing in a league far outside its price realm.

Read: Nissan GT-R Review.




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