The race-bred version of the Diablo is number 4 of just 30 ever made.
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An ultra-rare Lamborghini Diablo GTR race car is expected to fetch in excess of $1 million when it goes under the hammer in an Australian online auction this weekend.

One of just 30 examples ever made, the Diablo GTR was designed for competition, replacing the Diablo SV-R raced in the Diablo Super Trofeo series. The GTR, based on the roadgoing Diablo GT, was unveiled to the public at the 1999 Bologna motor show before making its racing debut in 2000.

The Diablo GTR was powered by the same 6.0-litre V12 as found in the road-going version, but with modifications to the engine including variable valve timing, titanium connecting rods and a lighter crankshaft.

That boosted outputs to 440kW and 640Nm and propelled the Diablo GTR from 0-60mph in 3.5 seconds and a top speed of 338km/h.

The Diablo GTR came standard with a five-speed manual transmission sending those prodigious outputs to the rear wheels.

This example, however, has been modified as per Australian GT regulations at the time, and now features a sequential gearbox which Team Lamborghini Australia driver, Peter Hackett, claimed improved lap times by around 0.4 sec a lap.

Hackett raced this example in the Australian GT Championship and remembers the car fondly.

“The reason this car is so special not only is its exclusivity; 1 of 30 ever made, but this particular car was one of the most successful race cars ever to race in Australia,” he said.

Bidding for the car is currently underway at Lloyds online auctions, www.lloydsonlione.com.au, and closes on June 27. The current bid sits at $177,000 but Lee Hames, Chief Operations Officer for Lloyds Auctions, revealed overseas interest will likely see the Diablo GTR fetch a record price.

“We are already receiving such enquiry from all over the world to suggest that this will be a record result come auction day,” he said.

“It is speculated that only 28 still exist and we’ve had enquiry from Europe, Russia and North America so who knows where it will end up, but hopefully an Australian bidder keeps it on Australian soil.”