F1 and sports car specialist commemorates a tragic milestone of the man who founded the company.
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A special tribute has been paid to the founder of the iconic McLaren Formula One team and specialist sports car maker, Bruce McLaren, on the 50th anniversary of his death behind the wheel.

June 2 2020 marks exactly 50 years since Kiwi engineer, technician and racing legend Bruce McLaren was killed in an accident during testing at Goodwood circuit, located in West Sussex, UK.

In honour of McLaren’s lasting legacy, a private ceremony was held at the brand's Woking headquarters.

During the ceremony, McLaren's daughter, Amanda McLaren, unveiled a one-off bronze statue it had commissioned.

Further to the unveiling, 50 candles were lit around a selection of historic McLaren race cars, including the ‘sister car’ to the M8D in which McLaren was killed.

"It is an honour to mark the 50th anniversary of the death of Bruce McLaren by unveiling this wonderfully crafted statue to commemorate his life and achievements," said Amanda McLaren, daughter of Bruce and the ambassador for the McLaren Automotive division.

“McLaren’s accomplishments over more than 50 years in Formula One, the landmark victory at the 1995 24 Hours of Le Mans race and the supercars and hypercars designed, developed and built under the McLaren banner, all stand as his legacy.”

The bronze statue was created by painter and sculptor, Paul Oz.

The brand plans to place the statue on the McLaren Technology Centre boulevard, where it showcases a collection of significant road and race cars.

At the time of his death, McLaren was testing a modified version of the M8A racecar, called the M8D.

This version was being prepared for the upcoming 1970 Can-Am season. A loss of aerodynamic downforce spun the vehicle off the track, causing an accident which claimed McLaren's life.

The M8D, pictured above, went on to win the 1970 Can-Am race series driven by fellow Kiwi and team-mate, Denny Hulme.

McLaren was only 32 years old when he died.