With it may not seem all that different on the surface, the new Range Rover is likely to receive a fairly major under-the-bonnet overhaul.
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Jaguar Land Rover's fifth-generation Range Rover has been spotted testing its winter chops on the roads of Arjeplog in Northern Sweden, ahead of its anticipated release in 2021.

These spy photos offer a first glimpse at a long-wheelbase prototype of the car, which JLR is positioning as an even more luxurious vehicle capable of taking on upmarket competitors like the Bentley Bentayga.

Additionally, the new Range Rover – typically available in both long- and standard-wheelbase form – will see a powertrain overhaul expected to herald the eventual arrival of an all-electric version of the established SUV.

While the camouflage makes it difficult to ascertain any specific details, the new Range Rover appears to have retained its instantly recognisable boxy body without adding much more length or height beyond the existing model.

The vehicle appears complete under its disguise, with production headlights and taillights just barely visible – albeit with well-camouflaged details.

We already know this newcomer won't be an styling game changer, with JLR previously suggesting the 2021 Range Rover will bear a more "evolutionary approach" to design.

But where the car will see the most marked changes is in its underlying architecture and powertrain options.

The key difference is that this particular model marks the first time the big Range Rover receives JLR's new Modular Longitudinal Architecture (MLA), which will also be used on the new Range Rover Sport and Jaguar XJ.

The lighter platform is compatible with combustion engines, hybrids and fully electric models, with the new Range Rover expected to utilise a range of powertrains, from plug-in hybrid, to mild-hybrid and the brand's first all-electric powertrain.

The latter will likely not be available at launch but is expected in 2022.

It's rumoured the new Range Rover will also receive a V8 powertrain supplied by BMW, as part of JLR's plans to partner with other manufacturers in order to share powertrains and architecture.

The Range Rover will also receive a new sibling, an all-new Range Rover crossover, underpinned by the MLA platform.

Land Rover design director Gerry McGovern has previously spoken of the brand's new design direction, telling Auto Express: “For me, what we’ve actually shown is the ability of the brand to stretch and be different.

"We always have been quite pioneering. Let me just put it this way – if people like Bentley and Rolls-Royce can do an SUV, why can’t Land Rover or Range Rover do a luxury car?”