While there is still no word on pricing for the Chevrolet Corvette in Australia, the first one in the US has sold for big money.
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The first 2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8 has sold at auction for US$3 million (AUD$4.34 million).

That's a massive $2.92 million more than the North American RRP of USD$74,995 (AUD$109,000) for the C8 bearing VIN 001.

Australian pricing for the new Corvette is yet to be announced, but last month Holden teased us with a photo of a car being tested at its engineering facility in Lang Lang south-east of Melbourne, ahead of its scheduled showroom arrival next year.

The first Corvette C8 was auctioned at Barratt Jackson in Scottsdale, Arizona on the weekend with the winner also having the option of picking up the first mid-engined Corvette from its plant in Bowling Green, Kentucky, and taking a tour of the Corvette museum. A letter of authenticity and some artwork is also included.

This Corvette C8 was sold with the Z51 and 3LT package with a black exterior, black GT2 seats, featuring red trim and seatbelts, a removable roof panel, rear spoiler, and Performance Data Recorder.

It had the standard 6.2L LT2 V8 engine that produces 364kW and 630Nm, with a claimed 0-97km/h time in less than three seconds, and is paired to an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission.

Much like the Shelby Mustang GT500 and the first new-generation Toyota Supra that were auctioned, the proceeds of this Corvette C8 go towards charity; the Detroit Children’s Fund, a non-profit organisation that invests in schools in Detroit.

The highest bidder was Rick Hendrick, founder and CEO of automotive group, Hendrick Companies.

“I am the number one Corvette junkie in the world,” Mr Hendrick was quoted as saying in a General Motors press release. "Thanks to Chevrolet and Barrett-Jackson, because they always pick charities that are so good and help so many people."

The Corvette C8 is the first to be factory-built in right-hand-drive. Holden has announced it is coming to Australia. Exact timing and prices are yet to be announced.

With a strike at its assembly plant late last year, production for the US market has been delayed until February 2020; right-hand-drive examples are expected to follow about 12 months later.