All-new city car gets the company's sport-themed trim level for Frankfurt, though like the core range you won't be seeing it in Australia anytime soon.
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Hyundai Motor Europe has debuted the i10 N Line at the Frankfurt motor show this week, following the reveal of the regular micro hatch last week.

The new-generation i10 is the fourth model in Hyundai's European line-up to get the N Line treatment, following the larger i30, i30 Fastback and Tucson.

Externally, the i10 N Line gets redesigned bumpers and a new front grille, model-specific 16-inch alloy wheels, and unique LED daytime-running lights. There's also red exterior accents and the option of a contrasting black roof to complement the six available exterior colours.

Inside, there's an N-branded steering wheel and shift lever, red highlights for the air vent rings, contrasting red stitching for the upholstery, and metal pedals.

There's also 'sporty' seats which offer more support for a "performance-oriented driving position".

Further to the exterior and interior enhancements, the i10 N Line will also be available with an exclusive powertrain in the i10 line-up – a 1.0-litre 'T-GDi' turbocharged three-cylinder petrol engine.

Outputs for the new motor are rated at 100PS (73kW) and 172Nm, mated exclusively to a five-speed manual transmission driving the front wheels. The 1.2-litre four-cylinder petrol engine from the core range will also be available, with the choice of a five-speed manual or five-speed automated manual transmission.

Australia

Like the standard i10 (above) the N Line doesn't look like it'll be heading Down Under to take on the related Kia Picanto in the micro car segment.

"The i10 and i20 are both produced in Europe, and with the current exchange rates we can’t make a rational business case for their introduction locally," Guido Schenken, Hyundai Australia's PR manager, told CarAdvice following the reveal of the core i10 range.

Kia's Picanto is sourced from South Korea for the Australian market, no doubt helping to greatly reduce the costs associated with importing the vehicles Down Under.