The market continued its slide, recording its 14th straight month of declining sales.
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Car dealers are reporting a sales recovery since last month's Federal Election, but Australian new car registrations continued to decline in May, the 14th consecutive month of sales slowdown.

VFACTS data for May 2019 recorded 92,561 new vehicle registrations, down 8.1% from the 100,754 achieved in May 2018. That perfectly matches the state of the market in 2019: year-to-date sales are down 8.1% compared to the same point in 2018.

Tasmania is the only state seeing growth in 2019, up 5.5% in May and 2.2% year-to-date, while the Northern Territory has seen the biggest slide. It's down 10.7% year-to-date, and saw a 20.2% dip in sales during May.

Passenger cars continued to struggle, down 11.9% last month with 28,890 sales and a 31.2% share of the market, while SUV sales totalling 40,937 represent a 4.7% drop and 44.2% market share.

A total of 19,178 light commercial vehicles were registered, a dip of 9.0% on May 2018.

Tony Weber, Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI) chief executive, attributed the market's continual decline to factors like "an economic downturn, drought, political events, the tightening of financial lending and lack of confidence in the market".

He's optimistic confidence from the now-completed Federal Election will help drive consumers back to the dealership, suggesting the market will "improve over the next few months".

Brands

Toyota was, unsurprisingly, number one in May with 18,820 sales (down 3.8%) and a whopping 20.3% market share. It was followed by Mazda, which recorded 8578 sales (down 8.8%) for a 9.3% market share, and Hyundai with 8106 registrations (down 8.0%) and an 8.8% share.

Ford was one of a few brands defying the market slump with 5788 sales (up 0.9%) and a 6.3% market share, followed by Kia with 5533 sales (up 0.6%) and a 6.0% market share.

Mitsubishi slipped out of the top five, recording 5120 registrations (down 26.0%) and a 5.5% market share, followed by Volkswagen (4520, down 16.8%) and Holden (4392, down 14.4%).

Subaru (4023, up 0.1%) snuck into ninth on the charts, and Nissan (3970, down 8.4%) pipped Honda (3697, down 10.7%) for tenth place.

Honda was followed by Mercedes-Benz Cars (2621, down 9.6%), Isuzu Ute (2129, down 13.8%), BMW (2052, down 2.3%), Suzuki (1500, up 4.7%) and Audi, which continued its rotten run with 1177 sales, down 36.4% on May 2018.

Lexus recorded a strong 860 sales, up 5.9%, followed by Land Rover (841, down 1.1%), Skoda (623, up 5.6%) and Volvo (600, up 5.8%).

Models

Toyota's HiLux keeps on keeping on atop the charts, with 4206 registrations (down 4.1%) giving it top spot ahead of a resurgent Ford Ranger (3972, up 8.1%).

The new, more expensive Toyota RAV4 (2917, up 41.4%) is now in showrooms and selling strongly, taking third place ahead of the Hyundai i30 (2901, up 4.4%) and Toyota Corolla (2467, down 20.9%).

Mazda's pricier new 3 (2359, down 8.8%) took sixth, followed by the Toyota LandCruiser (2301, down 4.0%), Mazda CX-5 (2100, down 11.8%) and Kia Cerato (2024, up 9.8%). The Toyota Prado rounded out the top 10, recording 1776 sales – a 3.6% bump on May 2018.

Segment Leaders

Passenger segments:

Micro: Kia Picanto (505, 81.3% share), Fiat 500 (64, 10.3%), Mitsubishi Mirage (52, 8.4%)
Light: Hyundai Accent (1073, 18.3%), Mazda 2 (788, 13.5%), Toyota Yaris (774, 12.3%)
Light over $25k: Mini hatch (151, 93.8%), Citroen C3 (nine, 5.6%), Peugeot 208 (one, 0.6%)
Small: Hyundai i30 (2901, 20.9%), Toyota Corolla (2467, 17.7%), Mazda 3 (2359, 17%)
Small over $40k: Mercedes A-Class (462, 38.2%), Audi A3 (302, 25%), BMW 1 Series (224, 18.5%)
Medium: Toyota Camry (1633, 68.4%), Skoda Octavia (199, 8.3%), Mazda 6 (177, 7.4%)
Medium over $60k: Mercedes C-Class (421, 34.5%), BMW 3 Series (266, 21.8%), Audi A4 (110, 9.0%)
Large: Holden Commodore (670, 74.9%), Kia Stinger (157, 17.5%), Skoda Superb (68, 7.6%)
Large over $70k: Mercedes E-Class (95. 47.7%), BMW 5 Series (45, 22.6%), Mercedes CLS (20, 10.1%)
Upper Large: Chrysler 300 (29), Mercedes S-Class (13), Mercedes-AMG GT 4 Door (12)
People Movers: Kia Carnival (630, 55.9%), Honda Odyssey (131, 11.6%), VW Multivan (117, 10.4%)
Sports under $80k: Ford Mustang (348, 51.1%), BMW 2 Series (98, 14.4%), Toyota 86 (56, 8.2%)
Sports over $80k: Mercedes C-Class two-door (197, 46.9%), Mercedes E-Class two-door (66, 15.7%), BMW 4 Series (30, 7.1%)
Sports over $200k: Porsche 911 (48, 34.3%), Ferrari range (26, 18.6%), Mercedes-AMG GT (14, 10%)

SUV segments:

SUV Small under $40k: Mazda CX-3 (1250, 13.4% share), Hyundai Kona (1185, 12.7%), Subaru XV (1164, 12.5%)
SUV Small over $40k: Mercedes GLA (308, 21.8%), BMW X1 (260, 18.4%), Volvo XC40 (258, 18.2%)
SUV Medium under $60k: Toyota RAV4 (2917, 19.2%), Mazda CX-5 (2100, 13.8%), Hyundai Tucson (1710, 11.2%)
SUV Medium over $60k: Mercedes GLC/coupe (646, 22.5%), BMW X3/4 (522, 18.2%), Audi Q5 (364, 12.7%)
SUV Large under $70k: Toyota Prado (1776, 20.2%), Toyota Kluger (958, 10.9%), Subaru Outback (717, 8.2%)
SUV Large over $70k: BMW X5/6 (317, 22.8%), Range Rover Sport (200, 14.4%), Volkswagen Touareg (152, 11%)
SUV Upper Large under $100k: Toyota LandCruiser wagon (1399, 87.8%), Nissan Patrol (195, 12.2%)
SUV Upper Large over $100k: BMW X7 (152, 46.5%), Audi Q8 (44, 13.5%), Mercedes G-Class (38, 11.6%)

Light commercial segments:

Vans under 2.5t: VW Caddy (164, 70.1% share), Renault Kangoo (56, 23.9%), Fiat Doblo (8, 3.4%)
Vans 2.5-3.5t: Hyundai iLoad (375, 25.8%), Toyota HiAce (364, 25.1%), VW Transporter (198, 13.6%)
4x2 utes: Toyota HiLux (1069, 35.7%), Isuzu D-Max (421, 14.1%), Ford Ranger (368, 12.3%)
4x4 utes: Ford Ranger (3604, 25.1%), Toyota HiLux (3137, 21.9%), Holden Colorado (1515, 10.6%)

Final figures

Petrol was the dominant fuel source, accounting for 56,937 sales. It was followed by diesel (28,460), hybrid (3498) and EV/PHEV (170).

The majority of our cars came from Japan (29,506 sales), followed by Thailand (22,979 sales), and Korea (13,673 sales).

Any questions? Fire away in the comments, and we'll do our best to answer them.