...but a stream of new models, improvements and accessories are looking to spruce up the numbers.
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Ssangyong is only on track to sell around half its initial target after 12 months of business, after re-launching in Australia with the Musso, Rexton and Tivoli in 2018.

Ssangyong Australia boss Tim Smith was shy about sharing numbers, but said figures be officially on the VFACTS industry report at the end of May. That target was 3000 vehicle sales in a 12-month period, but a number closer to 1500 now looks more likely.

The Musso is Ssangyong’s strongest performer, no doubt because of rabid demand for four-wheel drive utes in Australia. Ssangyong does have runs on the board with the Musso nameplate from the 2000s, along with the Actyon Sports ute.

Other models, namely the Tivoli and Rexton, haven't performed as well as Ssangyong had hoped.

The new Musso's 1300mm tub will appeal to some urban and lifestyle buyers, but will also turn away those looking for more load space. There’s no doubt the long-wheelbase XLV will help, with improved load space and payloads.

Ssangyong is also waiting on an all-new Korando to help bolster sales. It's a mid-sized SUV, which has some cache with Australian buyers. Our first drive revealed it's a capable offering, but it lobs in a very crowded and competitive segment.

Aside from new products entering the lineup, Ssangyong is looking to improve its current offerings with local tuning and accessories.

The Musso's localised suspension tune, along with a raised suspension kit, is still coming. CarAdvice understands local off-roading outfit Ironman 4X4 is doing the development work. Ironman 4X4 has previously worked on Australian suspension tunes for Haval.

It's been a long time coming, but Ssangyong still can't offer a timeline on when this revised suspension work will be finalised and available.

There’s also a host of accessories coming for the Musso, a process also taking longer than Ssangyong would like. Most of these accessories are being developed in conjunction with Australian companies, but larger volume projects have taken precedence and slowed progress for the Korean brand.

Getting these kinds of accessories developed in-line with local Australian Design Rules can be a very time consuming affair, too.