Electrical issues, design and engineering disagreements, and chassis flex on top-spec models have all reportedly pushed back the launch of the new 'Vette.

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette will shift from its traditional front-engine rear-wheel drive setup to a mid-engine layout.

Initially expected debut in the early part of 2019, the radically redesigned sports car has reportedly been pushed back to the end of year.

Sources have told Hagerty three reasons for the delay: bugs in the new electrical architecture, flexing of the car's structure in high-power variants, and disagreements between designers and engineers.

According to the publication arm of the classic car insurer, the new Corvette will be one of the first vehicles to use GM's next-generation CAN bus electrical platform, which allows all the car's various computer systems to communicate with each other.

Perhaps most eye-catchingly are reports of the car's aluminium spaceframe flexing enough to crack the glass engine cover when equipped with a twin-turbo V8 tuned to deliver between 670kW and 745kW (900hp and 1000hp).

Unfortunately the company's sources wouldn't elaborate more on the disagreements between design and engineering, but it may relate to visibility or cabin design.

The publication expects the eighth-generation Corvette to launch with a 6.2-litre V8 with around 373kW (500hp) of power, and a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission.

Future variants will keep things interesting with progressively higher power outputs. A hybrid may also be in the works, but its electric motor for the front axle could rob valuable space from the front boot.

When the new Corvette goes into production, it will be GM's first internally developed mid-engine production car since the Pontiac Fiero, the last of which rolled off the line in 1988.