The new Corsa is be the first new Opel/Vauxhall production car to be developed since the two brands were sold by General Motors to the PSA Group.

A prototype for the next-generation Opel Corsa has been snapped during winter testing in Northern Europe, wearing a full-body wrap.

As such, it's easy to discern the car's overall shape and form, but hard to make out many of its details. Despite this, we can see it will look substantially different to the next-generation Peugeot 208, which was spied earlier this month.

The new Corsa could sport some of the brand's new "bold and pure" design language, debuted on a pair of concept cars.

If it follows the template laid out by the GT X Experimental concept, the new city hatch will feature a ridge down the centre of its bonnet and slim, wide headlamps sitting about an angular grille.

Turbocharged three- and four-cylinder engines should drive the majority of models in the new Corsa range, but an all-electric version is scheduled to appear before 2021.

Under the skin the new Corsa and 208 both use the PSA's new common modular platform (CMP), which is being co-developed by the French automaker and Dongfeng, the Chinese car maker which owns around 13 per cent of the French company.

Prior to Opel and Vauxhall's sale to PSA Group in 2017, the company was close to completing development on the next-generation Corsa.

After the takeover, it decided to scrap the nearly completed new car, as putting it into production would require it to pay licensing fees to General Motors for the life of the vehicle, diminishing the economies of scale PSA is chasing from its next-generation platforms.