The smallest SUV offering from VW has finally made its debut, but we shouldn't expect it in Australia until 2020.

The 2019 Volkswagen T-Cross has finally been unveiled overnight at premiere events in Amsterdam, Shanghai and São Paulo.

Serving as the new entry point into the German brand's crossover family, the T-Cross measures 4.11m long and features a 2.56m wheelbase – making it smaller in physical size than a Mazda CX-3.

Despite its compact dimensions, however, the luggage area measures between 385L and 455L with the rear seats in place, which can be slid fore and aft to allow for more passenger room or cargo space. With the second row folded, the T-Cross can hold up to 1281L.

Based on Volkswagen's MQB A0 modular architecture, the T-Cross is available with a similar range of small-capacity turbocharged engines and high-end driver assistance technologies to other models in the company's stable like the Polo and T-Roc.

A pair of 1.0 TSI three-cylinder turbo petrol units are available, in 70kW and 85kW guises respectively, while a flagship 1.5 TSI four-cylinder turbo petrol with 110kW will also be offered.

The sole diesel option will come in the form of a 70kW 1.6 TDI. Volkswagen hasn't detailed which transmissions will be available, though expect the 70kW petrol to be offered with a five-speed manual as standard and an optional seven-speed DSG, while other variants should have a six-speed manual as standard with the option of a DSG.

Volkswagen has confirmed the T-Cross will come standard with autonomous emergency braking, lane-keep assist, hill start assist, blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, along with a proactive occupant protection system.

Optional features will include driver attention monitoring, adaptive cruise control, and an automated parking assistant.

Available infotainment and connectivity solutions will include wireless smartphone charging, up to four USB ports, and a touchscreen navigation system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Speaking of the cabin, the T-Cross has a rather unique flavour compared to other models in the line-up, getting a new steering wheel design and some funky trim and colour options. The R-Line versions pictured here seems to be fully specified with a 10.25-inch Active Info Display, dual-zone climate control, and keyless start.

The T-Cross will be manufactured primarily at the company's Navarra plant in Spain, one of the facilities where the related Polo hatchback is produced for Europe. Volkswagen has also confirmed the new crossover will be made in South America and China, where it is "specially tailored" for those two "growth markets".

Additionally, the company has committed to investing €1 billion ($1.61b) "by 2019" into the Spanish plant to "serve the particularly strong growth in the market for compact SUVs", which is potentially a bid to avoid production constraints like it has experienced with the larger T-Roc – hence why it hasn't launched in Australia yet.

Australia

Speaking with CarAdvice, Volkswagen's local division indicated we can expect to see the T-Cross in Australian showrooms in "around 18 months", pointing to a 2020 launch Down Under.

In the meantime, stay tuned to CarAdvice for all the latest and click here for more images.