Cars aren't just fun, they can also be used to help the elderly.

A fleet of classic cars will descend upon an aged care centre in Bankstown, New South Wales, this Father's Day, in an attempt to take residents for a trip down motoring memory lane.

Among the cars on show is a 1962 Chevrolet Bel Air, along with a vintage Ford Falcon that previously belonged to one of the centre's residents. Both are being brought along by friends, as a way to connect with elderly enthusiasts who otherwise mightn't have been able to enjoy them.

Although the event is open to the public, organisers say it's about keeping the centre's elderly patrons mentally active.

“A classic car show is a social way to relieve stress and engage in meaningful and joyful conversations with our residents. For people living with dementia, keeping active and socially engaged is wonderful for their self-esteem and general wellbeing," said Margaret Ryan, head of dementia services at Bupa.

"For older people, their risk of dementia may be reduced when they are connecting and reconnecting with what they love and enjoy.”

Although there's no cure for dementia, staying active – both mentally and physically – is one way to help prevent its onset. For those not suffering dementia, the cars can act as a break in their regular routine.

“Classic cars are a form of nostalgic therapy for our residents. In what other way can someone choose an era where they’d like to return?" Ryan asked.

"They simply choose the year of car, pick a model, pick a colour, tune into their favourite AM radio station and they’re instantly transported back to a time and place of their choice. It is a virtual reality for those who were born before the term virtual reality even existed.”

The vintage car show will take place on September 1, at Bupa Aged Care Bankstown in New South Wales. It'll be open to the public.