Sales dip, Holden's struggles continue, passenger cars fall off a cliff, and China is on the march
- shares

New vehicles in Australia fell 7.8 per cent in July over the same month last year, to 85,551 units. Every state and territory dipped, with the sole exception of Tasmania (up 5.9 per cent).

The poor showing in July — generally a hangover month after June’s end-of-financial-year promotional campaigns — means the annual tally for 2018 is now 0.2 per cent lower than 2017’s. Figures show 691,073 new vehicles have been sold this year (692,306).

VFACTS figures collated by the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries show passenger car sales fell an alarming 20.2 per cent for the month, while SUVs fell 1 per cent and light commercials tracked more or less even.

Every single passenger vehicle segment with the sole exception of Micro Cars (off a low base) plummeted, as ever more buyers migrate to SUVs for their family offerings. SUVs had market share of 42.8 per cent, against 33.4 per cent for passenger cars.


Brands

The podium was same as ever, led by Toyota (almost 20 per cent market share despite sales dipping 5.7 per cent) ahead of Mazda (down 6.4 per cent) and Hyundai (down 5.9 per cent). Mitsubishi (down 1.9 per cent) and Ford wrapped up the top 5, though the Blue Oval dipped 12.6 per cent as Mustang, Ranger and Everest demand weakened.

Kia, Nissan and Volkswagen occupied positions 6-8, and all actually grew their sales by between 3-5 per cent. New Aussie battler Holden clung onto ninth spot, dipping 39.3 per cent as Astra, Equinox and, to a lesser degree, ZB Commodore continue to disappoint. Subaru fell 21.1 per cent but snuck into 10th, ahead of Honda (down 7.8 per cent) and Mercedes-Benz (down 13.4 per cent).

Rounding out the top 20 were Isuzu Ute (up 14.9 per cent), ahead of BMW and Audi, which plummeted alarmingly by 21.8 per cent and 36 per cent respectively, ahead of Suzuki, Land Rover, Renault and Lexus (all down). Number 20 was Skoda, which grew 18.3 per cent and edged Jeep out, despite its own 11 per cent growth.

Other brands that grew in sales, against the trend, included Alfa Romeo (99, up 39.4 per cent), Citroen (50, up 117.4 per cent), Fiat Professional (135, up 16.4 per cent), Great Wall (55, up 96.4 per cent), Infiniti (55, up 19.6 per cent), LDV (511, up 147 per cent), fellow Chinese brand MG (281, up 540 per cent!), Peugeot (252, up almost 140 per cent) and Volvo Car (528, up 35 per cent).

Brands outside the top 20 that fell away included Mini (265, down 30 per cent), Fiat passenger (93, down 19.1 per cent), Haval (53, down 20.9 per cent), Jaguar (173, down 17.6 per cent), Maserati (48, down 12.7 per cent) and Porsche (221, down 32.2 per cent).

To give you an idea of how concentrated sales are in our cluttered market, the top 10 brands had a combined 75 per cent market share, leaving another 50-odd to fight for the scraps.


Top 25 brands for July, 2018:

Brand

Sales

Change

Market share

Toyota

16,195

-5.7%

19.8%

Mazda

8920

-6.4%

10.4%

Hyundai

7061

-5.9%

8.3%

Mitsubishi

5908

-1.9%

6.9%

Ford

5481

-12.6%

6.4%

Kia

4403

+ 3.2%

5.1%

Nissan

4260

+ 4.1%

5%

Volkswagen

3981

+ 4.7%

4.7%

Holden

3927

-39.3%

4.6%

Subaru

3366

-21.1%

3.9%

Honda

3222

-7.8%

3.8%

Mercedes-Benz

2669

-13.4%

3.1%

Isuzu Ute

2162

+ 14.9%

2.5%

BMW

1683

-21.8%

2%

Audi

1352

-36%

1.6%

Suzuki

1297

-14.6%

1.5%

Land Rover

729

-36.8%

0.9%

Renault

691

-9.4%

0.8%

Lexus

641

-4.2%

0.7%

Skoda

601

+18.3%

0.7%

Jeep

566

+ 11%

0.7%

Volvo Car

528

+ 34.7%

0.6%

LDV

511

+146.9%

0.6%

MG

281

+538.6%

0.3%

Models

As has become familiar, it was the Toyota HiLux and Ford Ranger atop the charts, ahead of the runout Toyota Corolla and Mazda 3 small cars.

Next were the Mazda CX-5 (the nation's #1 SUV), Hyundai i30 (if we included the Elantra sedan the total would be ahead of the Mazda), Toyota RAV4, Volkswagen Golf, Nissan X-Trail and Hyundai Tucson.

From the top 20, there are six Utes, six Medium SUVs, five Small Cars, three Small SUVs, two large SUVs, and one of the following: Medium Car, Upper Large SUV and Light Car.


Top 25 models for July, 2018:

Model

Sales

Change

Type

Toyota HiLux

3747

Even

Ute

Ford Ranger

2950

-4%

Ute

Toyota Corolla

2594

-19.4%

Small Car

Mazda 3

2443

-0.9%

Small Car

Mazda CX-5

2233

-3.1%

Medium SUV

Hyundai i30

2178

+ 2.6%

Small Car

Toyota RAV4

1853

-6.7%

Medium SUV

Volkswagen Golf

1628

+ 62%

Small Car

Nissan X-Trail

1603

+ 9.6%

Medium SUV

Hyundai Tucson

1490

-13.3%

Medium SUV

Toyota Prado

1434

+ 17.8%

Large SUV

Isuzu D-Max

1434

+ 13.3%

Ute

Holden Colorado

1432

+ 9.2%

Ute

Kia Cerato

1428

+ 7.6%

Small Car

Mitsubishi Triton

1418

-20.5%

Ute

Toyota Camry

1317

-44.8%

Medium Car

Toyota Kluger

1256

+ 26.9%

Large SUV

Mazda CX-3

1233

-13.2%

Small SUV

Nissan Qashqai

1205

-2.7%

Small SUV

Mitsubishi ASX

1154

-25.3%

Small SUV

Hyundai Accent

1122

-31.7%

Light Car

Nissan Navara

1072

+ 11.9%

Ute

Toyota LandCruiser

1066

+ 2.4%

Upper Large SUV

Honda CR-V

1058

+ 32.1%

Medium SUV

Top three vehicles per segment:

Segment

First

Second

Third

Micro Cars

Kia Picanto - 353

Mitsubishi Mirage - 158

Fiat 500 - 64

Light Cars

Hyundai Accent - 1122

Mazda 2 - 850

Toyota Yaris - 767

Small Cars < $40k

Toyota Corolla - 2594 (runout)

Mazda 3 - 2443

Hyundai i30 - 2178

Small Cars > $40k

Audi A3 - 338

BMW 1 Series - 224

MB A-Class - 162 (runout)

Medium Cars < $60k

Toyota Camry - 1317

Mazda 6 - 276

Volkswagen Passat - 188

Medium Cars > $60k

MB C-Class - 401

BMW 3 Series - 316

MB CLA - 199

Large Cars < $70k

Holden Commodore - 557

Kia Stinger - 174

Skoda Superb - 74

Large Cars > $70k

MB E-Class - 124

BMW 5 Series - 41

Volvo S90 - 17

Upper Large Cars

MB S-Class - 25

Chrysler 300 - 14

Porsche Panamera - 9

People Movers

Kia Carnival - 529

Honda Odyssey - 120

VW Multivan - 87

Sports Cars < $80k

Ford Mustang - 546

Toyota 86 - 80

Hyundai Veloster - 76

Sports Cars < $200k

MB C-Class - 92

MB E-Class - 46

BMW 4 Series - 46

Sports Cars > $200k

Porsche 911 - 19

Ferrari range - 14

Lamborghini - 13

Small SUVs < $40k

Mazda CX-3 - 1233

Nissan Qashqai - 1205

Mitsubishi ASX - 1154

Small SUVs > $40k

MB GLA - 215

Audi Q3 - 207

BMW X1 -145

Medium SUVs < $60k

Mazda CX-5 - 2233

Toyota RAV4 - 1853

Nissan X-Trail - 1603

Medium SUVs > $60k

MB GLC/Coupe - 541

BMW X3/X4 - 419

Lexus NX - 310

Large SUVs < $70k

Toyota Prado - 1434

Toyota Kluger - 1256

Subaru Outback - 853

Large SUVs > $70k

BMW X5/X6 - 238

MB GLE/Coupe - 201

Audi Q7 - 192

Upper Large SUVs < $100k

Toyota LandCruiser - 1066

Nissan Patrol - 85

Upper Large SUVs > $100k

MB GLS - 103

Range Rover - 45

Lexus LX - 35

Small Vans

VW Caddy - 133

Renault Kangoo - 49

Citroen Berlingo - 27

Medium Vans

Toyota HiAce - 604

Hyundai iLoad - 268

Ford Transit Custom - 235

Large Vans

MB Sprinter - 349

Renault Master - 164

Fiat Ducato - 103

4x2 Utes

Toyota HiLux - 1087

Isuzu D-Max - 392

Ford Ranger - 350

4x4 Utes

Toyota HiLux - 2660

Ford Ranger - 2600

Holden Colorado - 1237

Miscellaneous

Top 5 vehicle segments by market share: Small Cars (18.1), Medium SUV (17.6), 4x4 Utes (14.2), Large SUV (12.1) and Small SUV (11.6)

Sales by type were: 37,453 private buyers, 35,393 business buyers with ABNs, 2928 were government agency sales and 6433 went to rental companies

Sales by fuel type measured: 54,141 petrol, 30,429 diesels and 981 hybrids and electric cars excluding Tesla.

The top 5 source countries included: Japan (27,370), Thailand (21,387), South Korea (11,864), Germany (6967) and the US (3362).

The ever-requested ute-based SUV sales race went: Isuzu MU-X (728), Mitsubishi Pajero Sport (429), Ford Everest (356), Holden Trailblazer (194) and Toyota Fortuner (139).

All states and territories, bar Tasmania, felt the July decline. New South Wales slipped 9.6 per cent, Victoria by 6.3 per cent and Queensland dropped 5.8 per cent. The remaining States were as follows: Western Australia (-8.1 per cent), South Australia (-11.3 per cent), the ACT (-12.2 per cent) and the NT (-18.8 per cent). Tasmania’s sales grew by 5.9 per cent.


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