Chief engineer doesn't want to see any 'Dukes of Hazard' type stuff.

If you've been following our coverage of the Ford Ranger Raptor, you may notice a familiar theme – it does jumps. But, don't expect to be covered by the warranty if you break it.

Speaking to CarAdvice at the launch of the 2019 Ford Ranger Raptor in Darwin this week, chief engineer for the Ford Ranger Raptor, Damien Ross, said that the company is using this opportunity to demonstrate – not encourage – 'stunt driving'.

"Well, let's make clear. What we're doing around here is to demonstrate the maximum capabilities of the suspension. And some of the jumps that you see [at the launch], they visually show that," he said.

 

"It's not a jumps vehicle. It's a vehicle that when you ride on an off-road track, a race track – you'll think that you'll maybe look at something and then you go, 'oh, but it'll take it, right?' and that's kind of what it's meant for."

Ross explained that while it's capable of this type of driving, Ford wouldn't warrant any vehicles that were clearly abusing the vehicle in this way beyond its regular use.

"It's not a stunt vehicle and customers shouldn't use it as a stunt vehicle. I don't want to see Dukes of Hazard stuff," he said.

"What we've done is, if you're an experienced driver and you're driving at your limit off road... we've made sure that it can take that kind of abuse. But we can't warrant it for [excessive stunts]."

But, with that in mind, it didn't stop Ford running two vehicles with roll cages around a course that included three jumps and a number of rutted corrugations. The two cars copped an absolute hiding during the day and were used extensively during development for durability testing.

So it's safe to say the car will hold together if you find a little bit of road safe enough to try your hand at stunt driving.