More details revealed for itsy-bitsy electric city car.

Renault has confirmed the Australian dealers that will sell the Zoe EV, while the electric hatchback's list price of $47,990 before on-road costs has also been announced.

CarAdvice last week confirmed the Zoe and Kangoo EV would be added to the regular Renault roster, marking a move away from the brand's previous fleet-only strategy.

The line-up will be offered in two trim levels: Life and Intens, priced from $47,490 before on-roads (or $51,990 drive-away) and $49,490 before on-roads ($54,540 drive-away) respectively.

Base models will be offered exclusively in white with dark grey cloth trim inside, while the top-spec gets a range of colour choices, rear parking sensors, a rear-view camera, 16-inch alloy wheels, a leather steering wheel and auto headlights/wipers.

Power comes from a 41kWh battery pack offering '300km real-life range'. With 68kW and 220Nm on tap from its synchronous electric motor, you can hit 100km/h in 14.5 seconds. We'd bet owners aren't worried about the sprint, somehow.

The car's dealer network will initially be limited. Sydney City Renault will fly the flag in New South Wales, Barry Bourke Renault in Victoria, Unley Renault in South Australia, and Melville Renault in Perth. Brisbane, Canberra and Hobart will get dealers, while Melbourne and Sydney will soon have their representation doubled.

"Along with demand from customers, we’ve experienced positive interest from within our dealer network of existing Renault dealers who wish to expand their product offering and become Renault electric vehicle specialists," said Andrew Moore, Renault Australia's managing director.

"They’ve recognised the opportunity that electric vehicles can bring to their local area and they’ve made the investment in their dealership to become ZE ready."

Speaking with CarAdvice last week, Moore elaborated on how the brand plans on stocking and selling what is a very niche product.

"The important thing for me is, you see with EVs in the past where people have got too ambitious and overstocked, and that creates issues in itself," he said. "So we want to just keep it to a manageable number, we've got to see what level of demand comes from the retail customer," he said.