Winners, losers, and a full breakdown of industry sales results

Australia’s new vehicle market cooled off in April after a record first-quarter to the calendar year, with the industry’s VFACTS figures reporting 82,930 cars and trucks sold, down 0.2 per cent over the same month last year.

One-third of the way into the sales year, the market tally sits at 374,468 units, up 3.3 per cent over 2017’s all-time record figure. So, this year is still set to be the biggest ever for sales/demo registrations.

April sales always taper off, because March is consistently a massive month, with Japanese brands clearing stock before the end of their financial year, and others wanting to report strong Q1 results. There are also fewer selling days, as a rule of thumb.

As has become the norm, SUVs were the dominant vehicle type, taking 43.6 per cent market share, ahead of passenger vehicles (basically any car that’s not a SUV) on 33.2 per cent, and light commercial vehicles (utes, vans and small buses) 19.4 per cent.

Much of the small market contraction came from NSW, which was down 5.5 per cent and is the nation’s biggest market. By contrast, fellow major populations Victoria and Queensland managed small growth.


Brands

Toyota remains top of the pops, managing 16,647 sales (up 3.5 per cent, bucking the trend). This tally is more than the next two brands combined, Mazda (7723, down 10.5 per cent) and Hyundai (7132, up 4.2 per cent).

Next was Mitsubishi on 5508 (up 0.7 per cent), Ford (4822, down 16.9 per cent), Holden (4576, down 21.2 per cent), Kia (4502, up 9.3 per cent), Subaru (4017, up 4.2 per cent), Volkswagen (3918, up 1.3 per cent) and Mercedes-Benz (3256, even).

MB’s big month pushed Nissan (3028, down 9.6 per cent) outside the top 10. Ditto Honda on 3017, which nevertheless was up 6.7 per cent. Rounding out the top 15 were BMW (1823, up 1.2 per cent), Isuzu Ute (1713, up 2.9 per cent) and Audi (1495, up 7.5 per cent).

Some smaller-volume companies that grew in a statistically significant way included, in alphabetical order:

Alfa Romeo (112, up 30.2 per cent), Fiat Professional (108, up 31.7 per cent), Land Rover (733, up 32.8 per cent), LDV (458, up 177.6 per cent!), Lexus (830, up 20.5 per cent), MG (180, up 227.3 per cent), Mini (298, up 9.6 per cent), Peugeot (153, up 14.2 per cent) and Volvo Car (510, up 93.9 per cent!).

Some smaller-volume companies that shrank in a statistically significant way included, in alphabetical order:

Fiat passenger (96, down 40.4 per cent), Jaguar (169, down 15.1 per cent), Porsche (310, down 16.4 per cent), and Suzuki (1085, down 8.9 per cent).

Brands you guys are always interested in, but which were neither up or down hugely, included Jeep (640, down 5.5 per cent), Renault (700, up 3.4 per cent), and Skoda (400, up 7 per cent).


Models

The top-ten most popular vehicles were the Toyota HiLux, Toyota Corolla, Ford Ranger, Mazda 3, Hyundai i30, Hyundai Tucson, Mazda CX-5, Mitsubishi ASX, Toyota Prado and Holden Colorado. Three small cars, four SUVs and three utes.

The top-three vehicles per segment, mostly as defined by VFACTS (within which there are some clear issues, but you have to start somewhere) were:

Segment GoldSilverBronze
Micro carKia Picanto - 384Fiat 500 - 62Holden Spark - 44
Light car under $25kHyundai Accent - 1160Mazda 2 - 791Toyota Yaris - 665
Light car over $25kMini Hatch - 175Audi A1 - 99Mini Clubman - 28
Small car under $40k Toyota Corolla - 2979Mazda 3 - 2261Hyundai i30 - 1903
Small car over $40k Audi A3 sedan/hatch - 318Mercedes A-Class - 297BMW 1 Series - 225
Mid-size car under $60kToyota Camry - 1114Ford Mondeo - 208Mazda 6 - 180
Mid-size car over $60kMercedes C-Class - 494BMW 3 Series - 256Mercedes CLA - 206
Large car under $70kHolden Commodore - 587*Kia Stinger - 184Skoda Superb - 62
Large car over $70kMercedes E-Class - 101BMW 5 Series - 52 Audi A6 - 35
People movers Kia Carnival - 479LDV G10 - 88Honda Odyssey, Volkswagen Multivan - 81
Sports car under $150k Ford Mustang - 381 Mercedes C-Class - 137 BMW 2 Series - 124
Sports car over $150k Porsche  911 - 57Ferrari range - 21 Mercedes-AMG GT - 17
Small SUV under $40kMitsubishi ASX - 1706Mazda CX-3 - 1172Subaru XV - 1139
Small SUV over $40kMercedes GLA - 297BMW X1 - 218Audi Q3 - 177
Mid-size SUV under $60kHyundai Tucson - 1816Mazda CX-5 - 1725Toyota RAV4 - 1444
Mid-size SUV over $60kMercedes GLC - 516BMW X3/X4 - 494Audi Q5 - 321
Large SUV under $70kToyota Prado - 1699Toyota Kluger - 1063Subaru Outback - 862
Large SUV over $70kMercedes GLE - 225Lexus RX - 222BMW X5/X6 - 221
X Large SUV under $100kToyota LandCruiser - 1262Nissan Patrol - 83
X Large SUV over $100kMercedes GLS - 68Lexus LX - 34Range Rover - 25
Small vansVolkswagen Caddy - 186Renault Kangoo - 51Citroen Berlingo - 10
Medium vansToyota HiAce - 509Hyundai iLoad - 319Renault Trafic - 138
Big vansMercedes Sprinter - 179Renault Master - 118 Fiat Ducato - 102
4x2 utesToyota HiLux - 937Ford Ranger - 449Isuzu D-Max - 347
4x4 utes Toyota HiLux - 2659Ford Ranger - 2347Holden Colorado - 1300

* 473 Commodores were imported ZB


Miscellaneous

Top five segments: Mid-size SUV (17.5 per cent share), Small Cars (17.4), 4x4 utes (13.7), Small SUV (12.2), Large SUV (12.1)

Sales type: Private buyers (44.9 per cent share), business buyers (44.7), rental companies (6.6) and government agencies (3.8)

Sales by fuel type: Passenger cars (25,360 petrol, 1156 diesel, 977 hybrid). SUVs (25,567 petrol, diesel 10,412, hybrid 142). Commercials (petrol 1012, diesel 18,225)

Top five source countries: Japan (26,363), Thailand (19,964), Korea (12,925), Germany (6973), USA (3247)

Ute-based SUV sales race: Isuzu MU-X (557), Ford Everest (443), Mitsubishi Pajero Sport (332), Toyota Fortuner (318), Holden Trailblazer (233)


Any questions? Ask below and we’ll answer them as soon as possible.