But pure internal combustion will live on, too

Every Aston Martin and Lagonda on sale in 2025 will be offered with an electrified powertrain, but don't get worried yet: internal combustion isn't going anywhere, either.

Vice president and chief marketing officer, Simon Sproule and Marek Reichman, chief creative officer, told media in Melbourne the entire Aston Martin and Lagonda range will offer hybrid or electric options by "the middle of the next decade".

According to the two Aston high-ups – and as you'd expect – the electrified options will be tailored to suit the character of each car, with Reichman using the example of the Aston Martin Valkyrie and the Lagonda Vision Concept to highlight how batteries can be adapted for different applications.

"Lagonda, all-electric. Valkyrie, naturally-aspirated V12. So, the reason we can have these [internal-combustion sports cars] is because we have those [electric luxury vehicles]," Reichman told the assembled crowd.

"What you'll end up with is, each product then having an option to be hybridised, but you've got – if you're a petrol head – the world of your dreams and if you have a conscience, the world of your dreams."

These statements expand on a similar Financial Times story published a little while back.

What will carry the petrol-burning flag in these vehicles remains to be seen. Simon Sproule ruled out a four-cylinder engine, and said there are "no current plans" for a six-cylinder powerplant. He didn't entirely dismiss the idea of a six-pot Aston Martin hybrid, though, suggesting regulations could potentially force their hand.

"We're a V8 and V12 company," Sproule said. "That's where, ideally, we'd like to stay using electrification and hybridisation to make our range more efficient and meet regulations."

The first hybrid Aston Martin is already upon us... sort of. The V12 in the Valkyrie is electrically augmented, but the first series-production Aston hybrid will be the DBX.

"Of volume production cars, probably DBX will be the first in cycle. It'll be launched with... a non-hybrid engine, but a hybrid is planned in cycle," Sproule said. He wasn't sure (or wouldn't be drawn) on details about how much of the promised hybrid powertrains would be bought from Daimler, developed in-house or adapted from other partnerships.