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The electro-themed camouflage has come off the new 2019 Jaguar I-Pace today, ahead of an Australian debut in October this year – with a $119,000 price tag to match its enviro-chic image.

Based on the concept of the same name, unveiled in November 2016, the production car is almost identical to the original show car. Go on and call out the differences, we’ll wait.

With its design driven by the twin purposes of aerodynamics (0.29Cd) and the almost unstoppable compulsion for EVs to look a little futuristic, the electric I-Pace (which ought to have taken the E-Pace name, we know) blends a tall crossover silhouette with a somehow menacing pose.

The high-riding, five-seat, all-wheel-drive liftback is powered by a pair of “Jaguar-designed” electric motors delivering a combined 294kW of power and 696Nm of torque.

Energy is provided by a 90kWh lithium-ion battery pack, and Jaguar claims a driving range of 480 kilometres under the new WLTP standard.

A 7kW AC wall box at home will have the I-Pace charged to 80 per cent in 10 hours. Jaguar hasn’t specified a time for a 100 per cent charge, although it is known that most brands will limit regular daily charging to 80 per cent as a battery preservation strategy.

Charging on 100kW DC public points will deliver around 80 per cent of a full charge in 40 minutes, but a 15-minute charge will return a 100km range.

In Australia, the I-Pace will have only a three-year / 100,000km warranty, but the battery will be covered by an eight-year warranty – provided you don’t drive more than 160,000 kilometres in that time.

As for performance, the I-Pace promises a 0-100km/h time of 4.8 seconds – slightly bettering the ~$182,000 Tesla Model X 100D’s claimed time of 4.9 seconds, but not the 3.1 seconds offered by the ~$250,000 P100D’s headline Ludicrous Speed mode.

Jaguar says the I-Pace’s design – an aluminium architecture, with the battery pack mounted “as low down as possible” between the axles – ensures a 50:50 weight distribution and a low centre of gravity.

The company also claims a structural rigidity of 36kNm/degree; “the highest of any Jaguar”. (This writer was unable to find comparative numbers for other Jags, however.)

It rides on double-wishbone suspension up front and an integral-link rear, while air suspension and configurable Adaptive Dynamics options will be offered at an as-yet undefined extra cost.

Storage in the I-Pace is listed at 1453 litres with the rear seats folded flat, and 656 litres when upright.

Importantly for fans of modern gadgetry, especially those won over by Tesla’s pioneering approach, the I-Pace will offer over-the-air software updates.

Full equipment and pricing details are still to come, although Jaguar has confirmed the familiar S, SE and HSE trims, along with a First Edition model.

Doubtless we can expect the usual near-overwhelming list of options, although Jaguar Land Rover maintains its buyers appreciate the buffet-style freedom.

UPDATE: Jaguar Australia has now launched its I-Pace configurator, along with a page that explains the new EV’s technology.

Click through to our photo gallery for many more images of the new I-Pace

MORE: I-Pace news coverage
MORE: Jaguar news, reviews, comparisons and videos




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