Are journalists the only people who care?

The similarity between the Mercedes-Benz C-Class, E-Class and S-Class is a deliberate strategy – and it's working well, according to Gorden Wagener, Daimler head of design.

In a wide-ranging chat with Australian journalists after the launch of the new A-Class, Wagener addressed the similarities between the brand's traditional three-box sedans.

He admitted its C-, E- and S-Class sedans "are very homogeneous". He went on to say it was a "very conscious decision, very successful decision, but outside [those models] we play a lot with different things".

CarAdvice later asked if the company had received any negative feedback about the high degree of similarity between its core sedan models.

"No, no," Wagener replied. "Only a few journalists mentioned our three limousines are too close to each other, but the customer loves it.

"It’s a typical journalist question, but the customer loves it. (Laughs) So, no, you look at our numbers, I think we’re doing quite good in the moment, yeah."

Last year, the C-Class dominated the local medium car segment for vehicles over $60,000. With 8549 sales, it took the number one spot with 38.2 per cent share of the segment.

It more than doubled the sales of the second and third placed models in the category, the Mercedes-Benz CLA (3445), and BMW 3 Series sedan and wagon (2584).

In the large car segment over $70,000, the E-Class was also the clear sales victor with 1896 sales and an impressive 42.3 per cent of the segment. The BMW 5 Series (1245) and Audi A6 (315) rounded out the podium places.

Only in the upper large car over $100,000 category did the S-Class not finish first. With 113 sales it was well behind the BMW 7 Series (164), and a just a smidgen ahead of the Porsche Panamera (111).

What do you think about the similarity between the C-, E-, and S-Class sedans? Let us know in the comments section below.