The new Lexus LS hasn't quite made it to Australia yet, but that hasn't stopped the Japanese marque from showcasing the intricate pieces and trims that are available for the limousine's plush interior ahead of its local launch in April.

Headlining the interior is the availability of beautiful moulded glass panels inspired by Japanese kiriko glass, contrasting with stitched leather upholstery, metal door handles and hand-pleated silk surfaces.

Kiriko is a Japanese tradition involving hand-cut patterns into glass, which produce "stunning" reflections of light - often seen in vases, sake glasses and traditional ornaments.

The process of making these pieces of art suitable for vehicle interiors started back in 2014, when Lexus and Asahi Glass Company (AGC) partnered to explore the use of glass for automotive applications.

AGC found kiriko glass would be a real point of difference, though it would require a completely new moulding process and the challenge of emulating the reflecting effect of kiriko pieces without having light pass through it.

Toshiyasu Nakamura, a Takumi craftsman (above), was tasked with adapting kiriko glass for the new LS limousine.

His solution: "Cutting at altering angles through the hand-drawn lines on the glass results in a 'twist', allowing more light to reflect at different angles along those lines".

Some 18 months later, the final pieces were ready to be fitted.

Nakamura's 'twist' on the kiriko glass incorporates a new 3D digital scan when designing the mould, with AGC creating a new eight-stage process carried out in eight different locations across Japan.

"To me, Japanese beauty represents a subtlety and depth that reveals detail and craft the more one observes," Nakamura said.

"As reflected in the kiriko glass, looking at it from different angles yields different aesthetics, yet it conveys an overall sense of harmony and connectedness."

What do you think of the Lexus LS's kiriko glass interior trims?