With Ferrari opting to name its newest super-quick supercar the 'Superfast', there were more than a few stunned (read: unimpressed) faces when the new 2017 Ferrari 812 Superfast broke cover ahead of its world premiere at this year's 2017 Geneva motor show.

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But, as Ferrari product marketing head Nicola Boari told CarAdvice, while the iconic Italian brand didn’t specifically set out to call its latest road weapon the 'Superfast', the name is not as literal as some may think.

Speaking to CarAdvice at the 2017 Geneva motor show, Boari said the name behind the new 588kW/718Nm naturally-aspirated 6.5-litre V12-powered 812 is actually steeped in history.

Referencing lineage stemming from the 1956 and 1957 410 Superamerica, 1960 400 Superamerica, and the 1964 500 Superfast – the latter of which only 36 were allegedly made – Boari said the trigger for bringing the name back for the 812 Superfast, relates to the modern car’s blend of function and design.

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“Those [earlier models] were called Superfast because of the extensive, at that time, aerodynamic features, which were incorporated already in the initial concept car of Pininfarina, with the two fins in the back,” Boari said.

“Now this car [the 812 Superfast] has a lot, a lot of aerodynamics going on because, again, increasing power, we need to have the right balance. And so I think it came quite naturally. How can we signify the amount of aerodynamic solution and help crafted into the design, with something that is Ferrari? So there were not many discussions at that point.”

Although the 812 Superfast is up 44kW and 28Nm from the 544kW/690Nm 6.3-litre V12-powered F12 Berlinetta – and claims 0-100km/h in 2.9 seconds, a top speed of more than 340km/h, and is one of the most powerful and fastest road-going volume production Ferraris ever made – it’s the model’s extensive aerodynamic design and package that Ferrari says helps justify the Superfast name.

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Combining passive and active aerodynamics, the 812 features improved aerodynamic coefficients compared with the F12 Berlinetta and F12 TdF, along with unique turning vanes, diffusers, vents, air intakes, ducts, curved front underbody dams, and a taller rear spoiler.

“It’s not that we designed the car to call it Superfast, but after we saw the car, it felt quite right to bring it back – something which is not as literal as somebody may think,” Boari said.

“At least you need to be a thorough connoisseur of Ferrari to appreciate the name, which is good, because then people are going to ask, ‘Why this name?’, et cetera. They’re going to go back in our history. They are going to find out about our [past] models.”

The Ferrari 812 Superfast isn’t the first Ferrari to have a name that’s surprised. Plenty of eyebrows were raised when the 588kW/700Nm 6.3-litre V12 hybrid-assisted LaFerrari made its 2013 Geneva motor show debut, while the Ferrari Enzo, F60America, California and California T, and 575M Superamerica highlight other, more recent examples, of some of Ferrari’s various nomenclature.

What do you think of the Ferrari 812 Superfast name? Do you love it or hate it? Let us know in the comments section below.