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Would you buy a four-cylinder BMW 7 Series? If you’re in Australia, it seems exceedingly unlikely, at least according to the brand’s local boss.

Confirmation of a four-pot BMW 7 Series came this week when the company quietly added a new 730i variant to its Chinese and Turkish regions, assumedly with more to follow. In some markets, tax schemes incentivise the availability of small-capacity engines. 

Figures show the 730i’s 1998cc unit punches out a healthy 192kW between 5000 and 6500rpm, and 400Nm of torque between 1550 and 4400rpm. Just for some context, the 10-year old E65 735i V8 had 200kW/360Nm.

BMW 7 Series -001

Pictured: Australian-market BMW 740i. 

In other words, this is no developing market special. The claimed 0-100km/h sprint figure for the 1755kg vehicle is a brisk 6.2 seconds, which is only 0.6sec slower than the six-pot 740i petrol.

Interestingly, it’s the same TwinPower engine as used in diverse vehicles including the Mini John Cooper Works and BMW 330i. Matched in this application is the familiar ZF eight-speed automatic gearbox.

But BMW Australia managing director Marc Werner said the odds of the 730i coming here were slim to none.

BMW 7 Series New York Media Launch.

In Australia we do not see the necessity to go into such a low range of displacement…. I do not see any advantage or opportunities,” he told us this week. 

The Australian 7 Series line-up comprises the 730d diesel six, 740i and 740Li petrol sixes, and the 750i and 750Li V8s. Read our pricing and specs story here, and our 7 Series reviews page here.

What about it, would you consider a four-cylinder 7 Series? Or does it tarnish the badge to even consider it?