2007 Audi TT Coupe 3.2 Quattro S Tronic Road Test

$102,800 Mrlp
  • Fuel Economy
    N/A
  • Engine Power
    132kW
  • CO2 Emissions
    N/A
  • ANCAP Rating
    N/A

Test Model: 2007 Audi TT Coupe 3.2 quattro with 6-speed S tronic transmission.

CarAdvice rating:

Options Fitted:

  • Metallic paint - $1300 (if any car deserves standard metallic paint it’s the TT – flat colours won't do
  • Acoustic Parking Rear sensors - $850 (this is pricey for one set of sensors and again, you would expect this as standard kit across the model range, particularly on the 3.2 badged car)
  • Bose speakers - $1300 (I hate to sound repetitive but the TT should get the bees knees when it comes to audio and Bose speakers should be normal kit and a B&O unit should be the option.

  1. Introduction
  2. Background Info
  3. How it Goes
  4. How it Handles
  5. Interior
  6. The Look
  7. Space, Storage and Practicality
  8. Safety Features
  9. Future TT's

The 3.2 litre quattro coupe at $88,900 is the muscle car in the TT line up; with significantly more power and torque than its front wheel drive 2.0 litre turbocharged siblings, it sits just below the top shelf 3.2 quattro Roadster at $92,500. You can however, step into a TT Roadster for a modest $77,500 if you choose the 2.0 TSFI powerplant (and that’s with S-tronic). Entry price into the world of TT is $68,900 for the 2.0 TSFI coupe and if you tick S-tronic - $72,500.

The New York Times called it “historically significant” and nominated the TT as the “car of the century”.

You need to go all the way back to 1980 and Audi’s lethal road & track weapon, the “quattro” to find a car that defined this company’s core brand statement “Vorsprung durch Technik” (Progress through Technology) as much as the TT.

(Trivia) Kerry Packer liked fast cars - he owned at least two “quattros” that I know of, which were tuned by car racing legend Kevin Bartlett, for extra mumbo.

Credited with the TT’s design are James (“J”) Mays and Freeman Thomas out of Volkswagen’s California design studio. Both these guys were graduates of the design super school, the Art Centre College of Design in Pasadena. This Los Angeles institution is known as a kingmaker in the automotive design world.

Not sure where the TT badge comes from though. One story, is that Audi got the name from a small rear-engine car racing car called the NSU TT, which got it’s name from the TT (Tourist Trophy) motorcycle races on the Isle of Man. Regardless of where the name came from – we like it!

While we can’t help admiring each and every design accent on the new TT, feast your eyes on Audi’s Locus Concept. Let’s just hope Audi continues to shatter the envelope and build this sensational car!


Peak torque of 320 Nm kicks in between a very useable 2,500 and 3,000 rpm and the engine revs freely, delivering maximum power of 184 kW at 6,300. These outputs won’t set the world on fire but wrapped in this package, this engine punches well above its weight.

From a standing start, you’ll hit 100km/h in a genuine 5.7 seconds. Flat out will see the Speedo firmly striking a governed 250km/h, which will see you behind bars in this country.

Better still, is the superb deep-throated high performance burble of this tuned V6, clearly audible at idle, even better when nudging 6,300rpm.

Dropping the right foot, and holding fast, is a treat for any driver. The S tronic transmission (or Direct Shift Gearbox – a far better acronym) exploits every kilowatt and Newton-metre on offer, as it races through all six speeds like an F1 car on a qualifying lap.

Let me explain. The SMT gearbox in Ferrari’s million-dollar Enzo supercar changes gear ratios in a brief 150 milliseconds and yes, that’s quick.

But here’s where Audi can get a little cocky, and rightly so. Their S tronic (one gearbox, two clutches and two sets of gears) will upshift automatically in a mind blowing 8 milliseconds, and that’s with your mother behind the wheel!

Most times, you’ll be fine leaving the beautifully tactile shifter in “D” for Drive. But when you need to get serious, go ahead and select “S” for Sport, for a far more explosive experience.


How is the new TT quicker than the model it replaces, despite being larger in every dimension? Weight and weight distribution!

It’s over 100 kilos lighter, due to its 70% aluminium and 30% high- strength steel construction via the “Audi Space Frame” body developed in the 1990’s for their A8 series cars.

Weight distribution has been given top priority with steel components located mainly in the rear floor area in addition to the boot lid and doors so that axel loads are evenly split.

All up, the 3.2 quattro weighs in at 1,410 kg, which is LIGHT given the luxury trim and additional measurements.

And whist we haven’t driven the 2.0 TFSI, which tops out at 1,260 kg – we sure would like to!

The new car is slippery too. With a drag coefficient of .30 against the previous car’s .34, fuel efficiency is slightly better at highway speeds.

Continue reading....

How it Handles


  1. Introduction
  2. Background Info
  3. How it Goes
  4. How it Handles
  5. Interior
  6. The Look
  7. Space, Storage and Practicality
  8. Safety Features
  9. Future TT's


We don’t have the budget to run this test ourselves, but after a few minutes into a serpentine like stretch somewhere in NSW – we won’t be disputing it.

The TT feels extraordinarily nimble with huge grip levels, courtesy of the not so wide 245/40 tyres. Cornering ability ranks alongside high-end sports cars and as a consequence, bends can be attacked at unusually high speeds, while the car remains composed. Standard wheels are 18’s although, you can option up to either 19’s or 20’s shod with extra wide 255/35’s if you’ve had a good week! I’m a fan of wide rubber, so I would choose the 19’s although, the ride might be a little on the hard side.


Rear suspension on the other hand, has had a total makeover. Out, is the torsion-beam rear axel and in, is a highly effective, low weight, four-link set up, supported by twin-tube gas shocks.

Believe it or not, ride quality is now better than ever. Lousy suburban roads and shopping centre speed bumps are soaked up with almost as much grace as a 1964 Humber (poor man’s limo) – well maybe not quite that soft, but there’s no harshness or body jolt.

While the standard suspension kit does the job, and then some, you can however, opt for what is fast becoming the chosen system of some of the world’s fastest cars. Audi calls it “Audi magnetic Ride” (retail price of $2,444) Magnetic, due to the fact that the fluid contains microscopic magnetic particles which can alter suspension dynamics in a split second!

Similar systems are on board Ferrari’s 599 GT and even HSV’s latest GTS, which we will review in a week or two, and let you know more about what is essentially, the world’s fastest acting suspension.

High speed stability, which was called into question on early TT’s, due to potential lift at speed under very specific circumstances, has been completely eradicated, with the addition of a Porsche-like eclectically operated, speed activated rear spoiler.



I’ve never driven an Audi that didn’t pull up with extreme prejudice and the new lighter TT, is gifted in this area. In fact, so sensitive is the pedal pressure that it takes a bit of getting used to, at least initially.

What makes this TT so driver friendly, is the balance between handling ability and ride comfort, neither of which seems to have been compromised.

Continue reading....

Interior


  1. Introduction
  2. Background Info
  3. How it Goes
  4. How it Handles
  5. Interior
  6. The Look
  7. Space, Storage and Practicality
  8. Safety Features
  9. Future TT's


It’s hard not to sound like a bleeding ad for Audi, but these guys put together interiors that border on bespoke.

There is brushed aluminium everywhere; door openers, door handles, dash, centre stack, AC vents etc, etc, etc. The non-metallic materials are top shelf and as good as I have seen.


Similar to the 911, you are sitting in the car not on top of the car. And it helps, when you are encased in racing style seats trimmed in ultra soft Nappa leather. The hide quality is as good, if not better, than what Lexus use in their high-end models.


  • auto dimming rear view mirror with rain sensing wipers and auto lights on,
  • Bluetooth connectivity,
  • Cruise control,
  • climate control,
  • Audi’s driver information system with a digital Speedo readout (mandatory in this speed camera rich environment),
  • Automatic Climate Control,
  • Electric sports seats,
  • power windows

Continue reading....

The Look


  1. Introduction
  2. Background Info
  3. How it Goes
  4. How it Handles
  5. Interior
  6. The Look
  7. Space, Storage and Practicality
  8. Safety Features
  9. Future TT's

Twin pipes on the 3.2 are a carryover, but the LED brake lights are a welcomed treat. It’s a bigger car yes, but the lines are more graceful and the testosterone levels have been ramped by way of the single frame grille, as it falls into line with the current Audi corporate look.


Space, Storage and Practicality


  1. Introduction
  2. Background Info
  3. How it Goes
  4. How it Handles
  5. Interior
  6. The Look
  7. Space, Storage and Practicality
  8. Safety Features
  9. Future TT's





Continue reading....

Safety Features


  1. Introduction
  2. Background Info
  3. How it Goes
  4. How it Handles
  5. Interior
  6. The Look
  7. Space, Storage and Practicality
  8. Safety Features
  9. Future TT's

Dual stage front airbags for driver and passenger with side impact protection about wraps up the passive side of things, while the active safety systems are far more comprehensive.

There probably aren’t going to be too many times that the rear seats will be occupied, but nonetheless, I’d like to see curtain airbags in the TT. That would give rear passengers some protection in event of a serious crash.

Throughout the automotive world the words Audi and quattro are one. Tried, tested and proven on racetracks around the world, the quattro all wheel drive system proven more than a match for high powered rear wheel drive cars, particularly on waterlogged circuits.

Four-wheel drive has been banned by World Motor Sport Association (FIA) in their events due to an “unfair advantage” since 1998!

The TT, like all current quattro equipped cars, use a fourth generation system which delivers power to all four wheels all the time, rather than traction systems, which simply cut engine power if a wheel/wheels loose traction. Not ideal in mid corner situations!

But that’s not the half of it. The TT is equipped with a highly advanced Electronic Stabilisation program (ESP) which includes Anti Slip Regulation (ASR), Electronic Differential lock (EDL), Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) with electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD) and hydraulic brake assist.
You can’t believe how stable this car is in the wet. Put the power down in torrential rain and there is virtually no traction loss.

We haven’t tested this, but apparently, this Fourth Gen quattro requires just one wheel with reasonable traction to get the car moving. Wizardry!

Continue reading....

Future TT’s


  1. Introduction
  2. Background Info
  3. How it Goes
  4. How it Handles
  5. Interior
  6. The Look
  7. Space, Storage and Practicality
  8. Safety Features
  9. Future TT's

We can pretty much confirm that there’s a TT-S (for Sport) on the way in 2008, powered by the same turbocharged 2.0 weaponry as the super quick S3, producing around 200kW!


“The TT is a serious sports car no matter which model you opt for. It’s also the most distinctive car on the planet and I want one"”

By Anthony Crawford