The Chevrolet-FNR revealed at the Shanghai motor show this week is a prototypical wild concept car with styling that thumbs its nose at convention, pauses, and thumbs it again for good measure. 

Chev

An autonomous electric car with more than a hint of science fiction about it, the FNR is designed to show what GM sees as mobility in the future. We suspect its crystal ball is set to ‘long-term future’ mode.

The marketing blurb states the aim was: “to create a unique, intelligent vehicle for tomorrow’s younger consumers by utilising innovative car networking technology”.

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In practice, this means a futuristic ‘capsule’ design with crystal laser headlights and tail lights, dragonfly dual swing doors, magnetic hub-less wheel electric motors and a wireless auto-charge system. Inductive charging is on GM’s agenda in a big way, it seems

It also means a range of science-fiction extras. They include sensors and roof-mounted radar that can map out the environment to enable driverless operation, Chevy Intelligent Assistant and iris recognition start (yeah, it reads you eyes).

The Chevrolet-FNR can also serve as a “personal assistant” to map out the best route to the driver’s preferred destination.

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In self-driving mode, the vehicle's front seats can swivel 180 degrees to face the rear seats, creating a more intimate setting. The driver can switch to manual mode through the gesture control feature.

It was developed in Shanghai by GM’s Pan Asia Technical Automotive Centre joint-venture, hence the China debut.

Don’t be shocked if Melbourne's Holden Design played a hidden small role too, under the eye of Australian-based GM International Operations vice-president of design Michael Simcoe.

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Remember, it fabricated the show-topping Bolt EV from this year’s Detroit show, now confirmed for production, so it has the chops.

We’ve asked Holden if it played a role, so stay posted for that particular story.