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by Will Foster

A TRD version of the UK market Toyota 86 will be shown at July’s Goodwood Festival of Speed.

The TRD ‘Griffon Project’ Toyota GT86 is a limited edition version of the present road-going car, with candid performance and styling features promoting TRD parts and aiming to excite the majority of the rear-wheel-drive sports car’s loyal fan base.

The Griffon Project, developed by Toyota Racing Developments, has been exclusively designed for the track, with a lightened chassis and stiffened suspension among a myriad of other customisation changes to reduce weight.

The bonnet, boot, roof and doors have been removed, and replaced by lightweight carbon fibre, with the wing, rear diffuser and front bumper substituted with carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP). Each window is now made from a much lighter polycarbonate material.

However, the design of the original car remains similarly unchanged.


In terms of external visual changes that pretty much sums it up. Upon closer inspection, it’s not hard to notice this coupe was built for the track.

The insides have been gutted, with the driver’s seat replaced with a TRD-spec driver’s bucket seat, shift knob, ignition button as well as Oil and Water pressure gauges that adorn the dash. A Momo steering wheel has been fitted, as well as a Takata four-point racing harness.

Many of the cars workings have been strengthened or upgraded, too. The stock Torsen limited slip differential found in the standard 86 has been replaced with a TRD mechanical LSD, seeing the diff ratio shortened to 4:8:1. A coil-over suspension kit has been added to significantly reinforce the springs.

Additional performance – related changes include an oil cooler for the engine & race spec brake pads clamped to a TRD-designed mono block brake caliper kit.

To wrap up the authentic track spec kit, the Toyota GT86 Griffon Project is fitted with 18-inch TWS wheels on Yokohama Tyres, with the 2.0-litre ‘boxer engine’ retaining the same specifications as the road-going model.