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You would think that with all the high-tech gadgets in cars these days stealing a modern vehicle would be relatively darn hard? You would be right. The 2009/10 financial year has seen an 11 percent decline in passenger and light commercial vehicles (PLCs) stolen for short term according to National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council (NMVTRC).

The majority of the stolen cars (66 percent) that are eventually recovered are at least 11 years or older whilst the ones that never make it back are 64 percent likely to be made before 1999.

As it stands now, 67 percent of all PLCs driving around are fitted with an Australian-Standards Equivalent immobiliser, a marginal increase of just four percent over the same period last year.

The good folks in Western Australia (32 percent reduction) and South Australia (23 percent reduction) were for a second year in a row the least likely to steal your car, but overall the whole nation saw signs of improvement. Except for Tasmania.

Tasmanians saw an increase of 204 thefts which the NMVTRC says is mostly vehicles stolen for short term use. The reason for the increase is due to the state’s small base line population and its tendency to fluctuate.

Overall 11,514 PLCs were stolen but not recovered (SNR) in 2009/10 financial year. That represents about one quarter of all thefts. The national Stolen Not Recovered rate now stands at 0.8 per 1,000 registrations. So you have a 0.08 percent chance of having your car stolen and never seeing it again. More likely if its an older car.

If your car is five years or older, you’re in the target group for cars stolen not recovered. Tasmania, Victoria and the ACT all saw rises in the number of SNR. Whilst WA saw its SNR reduce by a good 28 percent.

If you happen to own a motorcycle and it gets stolen, there is a 63 percent chance you’ll never see it again.

Have you ever had your car stolen?

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