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by Brett Davis

Audi has just unveiled its latest hybrid diesel creation at the Paris Motor Show. It’s called the Audi e-tron Spyder and, well, just look at it. It not only looks stunning though, it also uses a 221kW twin-turbo diesel engine and an electric motor to really help it get up and go.

Using plug-in hybrid technology, the concept showcases one of Audi’s first diesel hybrid drivetrain attempts. The engine part of the equation is a 3.0-litre TDI six cylinder with two turbochargers outputting a very meaty 650Nm of torque and 221kW, all delivered to the rear wheels.

That alone is already sounding pretty good. But on top of this, it also uses two electric motors – one for each front wheel – which also supply 64 combined kilowatts and 352Nm of torque. These motors use 9.1kWh batteries that Audi says, can provide propulsion for the car alone for up to 50 kilometres. Driving the car in electric-only mode however does reduce the 250km/h overall top speed down to 60km/h.

But that’s right maths fans, this hybrid supercar offers, collectively, just over 1000Nm of torque. Audi says it’s enough to allow the car to sprint from 0-100km/h in just 4.4 seconds. Not bad for a diesel. Simply awesome for a hybrid.

To add even further greatness to this already compelling package, because the cars uses two electronic motors and a highly efficient TDI engine, Audi says average fuel consumption figures of 2.2L/100km can be achieved. This means the car has a range of 1000km on just one 50-litre tank of diesel.

It’s quite an achievement but we have to remember Audi has been dominating the performance diesel sector for a while now, with plenty of Le Mans-winning technology already under its belt, it was only a matter of time until we saw some of this technology trickle down towards production cars.

The bodywork utilises Audi Space Frame (ASF) technology, meaning the car is made using a combination of materials. The bonnet and some elements of the bumper bars and aerodynamic bits are made from carbon, while other structurally integral elements are made from extruded aluminium sections and die-cast one-piece structures. All in all, the car is able to remain very rigid and strong whilst only tipping the scales at 1450kg.

A simply excellent concept. It’s a shame that’s all it is at this stage though. We hope some form of it goes into production soon. We’ll keep you posted.




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