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by Brett Davis

New spy shots have emerged showing the Murcielago successor in the most detail we’ve seen so far. Although the car is covered in black tape and sheeting, the bodywork is highly distinguishable.

Deep front air intakes dominate the front end whilst a very flat bonnet flows straight up over the windscreen and over the roof.

The roof also appears to be concave, something not usually seen on a supercar, which could provide greater air flow. It’s hard to tell just how concave though from images alone.

We’ve never seen these wheels before either. They might be the production wheels coloured matte black for camouflaging purposes.

Like the Murcielago, there’s a huge side air intake to gulp in fresh air for the engine’s cooling systems. Even the doors come second to airflow priority; they’re completely cut out to allow for more flow. The fins on the doors are likely to be there for camouflage purposes.

From this angle we can see just how slippery and flat the nose goes up over the roof line. Engine air intakes are placed over the shoulders of the driver, like the Murcielago.

From here we can see more evidence of that concave roof. Notice the yellow under-colour on the side mirror proving what extraordinary lengths Lamborghini has gone to to conceal as much detail as possible.

The rear end is obviously squared-off for camouflaging purposes, the production version isn’t likely to be as ‘sharp’. Notice the Reveton style engine cover flutes.

From the image above we can also see a confused exhaust outlet arrangement, possibly used as a camouflaging decoy. The rear lights are hidden underneath the pointy cover attached to the rear deck edge.

Additional shots of the car being tested on Nurburgring show the car with typical mesh-style track wheels. Notice the little triangle window in front of the side mirrors below.

The size of the car alone is enough to label it as Lamborghini’s largest car. Speculations say the engine will be a V12 again, like the Murcielago, but it will be fitted with direct-injection and output around 520kW.

From here we can see the air-brake rear spoiler raising up on the top edge of the rear. There also seems to be some sort of intake or even an outlet cut-out (image below) which could be used to release second-hand air out in front of the rear wheel.

The new Jota is said to retain an all-wheel drive system but reports say it could adopt a Swedish Haldex setup, developed in conjunction with Lamborghini.

There’s been little confirmation from Lamborghini on these details though so we can’t conclude anything at this stage. Even the name ‘Jota’ comes from source-related rumours. It is very likely the Murcielago name will be dropped judging from past Lamborghini models however, which have always taken on a new name.

Lamborghini hasn’t confirmed if the car will debut at the Paris Motor Show in a couple of weeks either. It’ll be a fantastic media frenzy if it is unveiled there though. We’ll keep you updated.




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