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by George Skentzos

From today, mobile speed cameras have begun operating in NSW in a bid to reduce the number of speed-related crashes on stretches of roads deemed to be black spots by the NSW government.

The mobile speed camera initiative is part of a $170 million package including engineering works, highways safety reviews, education campaigns and heavy vehicle research in a bid to reduce the state’s road toll which stood at 213 deaths in 2009.

With revenue from fixed speed cameras dropping by $4m in the last budget year, the NSW government it poised to earn as much as $570m by 2012 (up from $219m in 2009) as a result of these new mobile speed cameras being used.

Each speed camera vehicle, revealed last week as white Ford Territory’s, will be operated by a private government contractor rather than a police officer – meaning offenders will be unaware they have been caught until a fine arrives in the mail a week or two later.

As though taking public safety out of the hands of the police wasn’t controversial enough, the organisation behind these cameras is partly owned by Macquarie Bank who has recognised the mobile speed camera operation as a lucrative business opportunity – investing $275m to the cause.

Motorists are not left without a fighting chance though, the RTA has released a list of mobile speed camera locations which covers Albury to Rouse hill and everywhere in between.

Tech-savvy motorists can also get the jump on the mobile speed cameras using a mobile device of their own, with a number of social applications such as Trapster and Waze available for motorists to send each other an early warning about the location of a mobile speed camera.

You can download a PDF list of all the possible mobile speed camera locations from here. (Right Click then Save As)




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