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by Brett Davis

Nissan announced today in a report it is developing a range of technologies which will see much lower fuel consumption ratings in their future cars. In the report, Corporate Vice President of Nissan’s Powertrain Engineering Division, Shuichi Nishimura said,

“Nissan is continuously studying ways to reach the ultimate efficiency of its powertrains for further CO2 emission reduction. As a result of that, Nissan will introduce a series of innovative technologies on its 3 and 4-cylinder gasoline engines as well as a new high efficient hybrid system.”

Nissan is using its ZERO EMISSIONS and PURE DRIVE initiatives as the driving force behind their future goals. The PURE DRIVE initiative is a consumer-oriented focus whereby the consumer is able to select from a range of optional fuel-saving packages.

The first PURE DRIVE car is the new Micra, to be launched in Japan this month, which incorporates Nissan’s idle stop technology and showcases fuel consumption figures of 3.8L/100km.

Also a part of the PURE DRIVE selection is the upcoming Clean Diesel X-TRAIL which uses a ‘highly dispersive lean NOx trap catalyst’ that is made up of platinum particles that are microparticulated to approximately 40%, this helps reduce emission levels typically associated with automatic diesel cars.

There’s also the luxury Fuga Hybrid sedan on its way, which uses a clutch system that separates the petrol engine from the electric motor completely under certain circumstances. This helps to cut friction and loads between the two, and thus reduce fuel consumption.

The ZERO EMISSION side of things is all about the outright focus for Nissan as a company and is the driving motivation towards improving technologies. Marketing and Sales SVP in Japan, Takao Katagiri also said in the report,

“The adoption of different types of low-emission technologies is a great solution as we can attend different consumer needs. PURE DRIVE vehicles will offer customers a wider selection of models fitting both their financial and environmental needs.”

We’ll keep you updated as these technologies progress, and as they eventually make their way down into the Australian market.




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