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The first month of this new year has been and gone, and, compared to last year’s all-time record, the market is already ahead of pace.

According to VFACTS data supplied by car-makers and compiled by the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries, the number of new cars, SUVs and commercials registered climbed 0.6 per cent over January 2016’s figure, to 84,910 units.

The margin between passenger vehicles and higher-riding SUVs also shrank away to almost nothing, with the figures showing 34,920 versus 34,127 respectively, ahead of 13,942 light commercials (vans and utes) and 1921 heavy commercials (trucks and big buses).

The five top-selling vehicle segments were small cars (17,830, up about 2 per cent), medium SUVs (13,956, up about 9 per cent), large SUV (10,970, up 2 per cent), 4×4 utes (9526, down almost 4 per cent) and small SUVs (8182, down 4 per cent).

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Top-selling brands for January 2017

Toyota was (as usual) the most popular brand with 12,554 sales, about on par with last year’s result. Given January is usually a slim month for fleet sales, an important factor for several key Toyota vehicles, its figures for January are generally lower than other months.

Next was the nation’s top full importer Mazda with 10,067 units (up 0.5 per cent), ahead of Holden (7184, showing some welcome growth to be up 5 per cent), Hyundai (6705,  down 4 per cent) and Ford (5912, up 7 per cent).

Rounding out the top ten were Mitsubishi (5075, up 1.4 per cent), Nissan (5012, down 10 per cent), Kia (another massive month of 4015 sales, up 29 per cent), Subaru (4009, up 18 per cent) and Volkswagen (3995, down 8 per cent).

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Knocking on the door of the top ten were Honda (3470, up 20 per cent), Mercedes-Benz (2973, down 4 per cent), BMW (2104, up a little over 1 per cent), Audi (2025, down 5.5 per cent) and Suzuki (1481, down 10 per cent as Swift stocks decline ahead of the new model).

In alphabetical order, here are some lower-volume brands that had good January figures: Fiat Professional (78, up 22 per cent), Infiniti (52, up 37 per cent), Jaguar (271, up 64 per cent), LDV (138, up 28 per cent), Maserati (68, up 89 per cent), Mini (285, up 8 per cent), Porsche (581, up 19 per cent) and Renault (864, up 20 per cent).

As-yet unmentioned brands that struggled included: Alfa Romeo (46, down 26 per cent as it gears up for the Giulia launch process), Chrysler (21, down 62 per cent), Citroen (37, down 49 per cent), Foton Light (58, down 13 per cent), Isuzu Ute (1095, down 21 per cent), Jeep (434, down 66 per cent), Lexus (566, down 11 per cent), Peugeot (218, down 30 per cent), SsangYong (13, down 71 per cent) and Volvo Car (391, down 18 per cent).

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Top-selling models for 2017

Australia’s top-selling vehicle was the Mazda 3, which has become something of a traditional January winner due to its strength in the private market.

Its 3473 sales put it ahead of its Toyota Corolla arch rival on 2943. Rounding out the podium was last year’s annual winner, the Toyota HiLux on 2702.

Next were the Ford Ranger (2622), Hyundai i30 (2018), Holden Commodore (1960), Mazda CX-5 (1924), Nissan X-Trail (1759), Hyundai Tucson (1678), Mazda CX-3 (1486), Holden Colorado (1458), Toyota RAV4 (1394), Kia Cerato (1372), Volkswagen Golf (1253) and Holden Captiva (1251).

 

Leaders by segment

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Micro — 685: Kia Picanto (324), Mitsubishi Mirage (158) and Holden Spark (115)

Light — 6366: Mazda 2 (1123), Hyundai Accent (1075) and Toyota Yaris (987)

Premium light — 447: Mini hatch (203), Audi A1 (159) and Mini Clubman (46)

Small — 16,468: Mazda 3 (3473), Toyota Corolla (2943) and Hyundai i30 (2018)

Premium Small — 1362: Audi A3 (480), Mercedes-Benz A-Class (327) and BMW 1 Series (209)

Medium — 1997: Toyota Camry (580), Ford Mondeo (251) and Mazda 6 (250)

Premium Medium — 1821: Mercedes-Benz C-Class (651), BMW 3 Series (270) and Mercedes-Benz CLA (244)

Large — 2208: Commodore (1960), Toyota Aurion (95) and Ford Falcon (73)

Premium Large — 348: Mercedes-Benz E-Class (154), BMW 5 Series (80) and Audi A6 (39)

Upper Large — 58: Holden Caprice (37) and Chrysler 300 (21)

Premium Upper Large — 29: BMW 7 Series (9), Mercedes-Benz S-Class (7) and Bentley Mulsanne (5)

People Movers — 916: Kia Carnival (382), Honda Odyssey (220) and Hyundai iMax (80)

Entry Sports — 1349: Ford Mustang (583), Hyundai Veloster (162) and BMW 2 Series (148)

Mid Range Sports — 607: Mercedes-Benz C-Class (255), BMW 4 Series (150) and Porsche Cayman (46)

Premium Sports — 171: Porsche 911 (57), BMW 6 Series (20) and Lamborghini Huracan/Aventador (17)

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Small SUV — 7332: Mazda CX-3 (1486), Mitsubishi ASX (1154) and Honda HR-V (1023)

Premium Small SUV — 850: Audi Q3 (320), BMW X1 (278) and Mercedes-Benz GLA (235)

Medium SUV — 11,487: Mazda CX-5 (1924), Nissan X-Trail (1759) and Hyundai Tucson (1678)

Premium Medium SUV — 2469: Land Rover Discovery Sport (423), Audi Q5 (331) and Porsche Macan (281)

Large SUV — 9162: Holden Captiva (1251), Toyota Prado (1063) and Nissan Pathfinder (933)

Premium Large SUV — 1808: BMW X5 (326), Audi Q7 (316) and Range Rover Sport (290)

Upper Large SUV — 868: Toyota LandCruiser (713) and Nissan Patrol (155)

Premium Upper Large SUV — 151: Mercedes-Benz GLS (85), Range Rover (26) and Lexus LX (22)

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Light Vans — 194: Renault Kangoo (73), Volkswagen Caddy (69) and Citroen Berlingo (26)

Medium Vans — 1251: Toyota HiAce (444), Hyundai iLoad (395) and Volkswagen Transporter/Renault Trafic (95)

Light/medium buses — 259: Toyota HiAce (152), Mitsubishi Rosa (39) and Renault Master (38)

4×2 Utes — 2602: Toyota HiLux (738), Ford Ranger (401) and Mazda BT-50 (385)

4×4 Utes — 9636: Ford Ranger (2221), Toyota HiLux (1964) and Holden Colorado (1333)

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Miscellaneous data from January 2017

Sales by State: NSW (29,068, up 2.4 per cent), Victoria (24,636, up 9.4 per cent), Queensland (15,709, down 8.6 per cent), Western Australia (7037, down 10.5 per cent), South Australia (5134, down 1.4 per cent), ACT (1438, up 5 per cent), Tasmania (1337, up 3 per cent) and NT (652, up 4.2 per cent).

Sales by type: Private (46,905, up 4.2 per cent), business (31,393 (down 5.7 per cent), government (2552, down 4.2 per cent) and rental (2139, up 16 per cent).

Petrol vehicles numbered 57,723, diesel (24,465), hybrid (775) and LPG a measly (6 units). Tesla doesn’t do VFACTS, so electric car figures aren’t realistic, though there were 16 BMW i3 sales, while zero Nissan Leafs found homes.

The leading sources of vehicles were Japan (25,505), Thailand (19,642), Korea (12,753), Germany (6759), Australia (3766), the US (3734) and England (2739).

 

TOP 15 BRANDS SALES +/- GROWTH
Toyota 12,554 up 0.8 per cent
Mazda 10,067 up 0.5 per cent
Holden 7184 up 5.3 per cent
Hyundai 6705 down 4 per cent
Ford 5912 up 7.4 per cent
Mitsubishi 5075 up 1.4 per cent
Nissan 5012 down 9.9 per cent
Kia 4015 up 28.9 per cent
Subaru 4009 up 17.7 per cent
Volkswagen 3995 down 8 per cent
Honda 3470 up 19.7 per cent
Mercedes-Benz 2973 down 4.1 per cent
BMW 2104 up 1.4 per cent
Audi 2025 down 5.5 per cent
Suzuki 1481 down 9.8 per cent

 

TOP 15 MODELS SALES +/- GROWTH
Mazda 3 3473 down 6.7 per cent
Toyota Corolla 2943 up 6.7 per cent
Toyota HiLux 2702 4×2 up 9.2 per cent

4×4 up 18 per cent

Ford Ranger 2622 4×2 down 8.9 per cent

4×4 up 12.3 per cent

Hyundai i30 2018 up 9 per cent
Holden Commodore 1960 up 57.8 per cent
Mazda CX-5 1924 up 9.9 per cent
Nissan X-Trail 1759 up 46.8 per cent
Hyundai Tucson 1678 down 18.7 per cent
Mazda CX-3 1486 up 6.8 per cent
Holden Colorado 1458 4×2 down 41.9 per cent

4×4 down 9.7 per cent

Toyota RAV4 1394 down 3.2 per cent
Kia Cerato 1372 up 90.6 per cent
Volkswagen Golf 1253 down 22 per cent
Holden Captiva 1251 up 136 per cent

 

Any sales figures not mentioned here that you want to know? Ask away, in the comments. 

MORE: VFACTS car sales news stories 




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