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Update: Read our Hyundai ix35 review.

Hyundai Australia has officially announced the Tucson replacement, now called the ix35, will be available in Australia in the second quarter of 2010.


A new diesel engine based on the recently released 2.2-litre turbodiesel (in Santa Fe and Kia Sorento) will highlight the new ix35 range.

Just like the i20, the ix35 was designed in the Korean company’s Russelsheim design studio in Germany. The design language change is rather obvious with a much more European look to the whole package that is being called “fluidic sculpture”.

Hyundai-ix-35-02

Although we can’t confirm Australian specifications, we believe a 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol engine will be offered alongside a 2.0-litre R diesel engine (same family as the 2.2-litre R engine).

Petrol variants will deliver 123kW and 196Nm of torque whilst the R diesel will be available in two variants (in Europe – we suspect Australia will only get the top-spec diesel). The base diesel will develop 102kW and 313Nm or torque whilst the top of the range model achieves a very impressive 136kW and 391Nm of torque (using around 6.5L/100km of fuel).

Hyundai-ix-35-03

Eventually there is the possibility of a 1.7-litre turbodiesel to join the lineup. The ix35 will be available in both front and four-wheel drive.

Much like the Santa Fe, the ix35 will come with a choice of either a six-speed manual transmissions or the new Kia/Hyundai jointly developed and fully sealed six-speed automatic transmission.

Hyundai-ix-35-04

Features include a rear-view camera available on the higher-spec variants (similar to the one found in the Kia Soul, Sorento and Hyundai Santa Fe) and start-stop engine technology.

On the more technical side of things, the ix35 has a wheel base of 2640mm which is 10mm longer than the current Tucson. It measures up at 4410mm in length and 1820mm in width, making it 85mm longer and 20mm wider than before.

It is unlikely that Hyundai will offer a V6 variant to replace the current mode (which is not very popular with buyers). Australian pricing is still undetermined.