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Aston Martin’s joint project with Formula One team Red Bull racing, the AM-RB001, will be the quickest track car ever, according to company boss Andy Palmer.

Speaking to CarAdvice at the Australian Formula One Grand Prix last week, Aston Martin chief Palmer said the AM-RB001 will be a “kick ass, no excuses” hypercar.

Although very little is known about the upcoming hypercar, Palmer has promised that it will be as quick as a current-era Formula One car around Britain’s famous Silverstone racetrack, with that being one of the definite ‘goals’ of the project.


“[I believe] it’ll be the quickest-ever track car. Going [fast] in a straight line is not really that interesting,” Palmer told us.

“The second century plan had in place that the fifth car was a supercar and we needed to have a mid-engine car at the top of our range, and it needs to be a kick ass, no-excuses car.”

The joint work with Red Bull racing means the involvement of world-famous aerodynamic designer Adrian Newey, who was instrumental in the success of RBR winning four Formula One world championships.

Now Newey is being unleashed to create the road car without any of the strict aero regulations of F1.

“Adrian likewise dreamt of doing a supercar, and if you’re wanting a no-excuse supercar – which by the way will be luxurious as well because it’s still a pure Aston – we spoke to Christian [Horner] and it happened that all the stars came together and Adrian got very excited and we kind of evolved the spec together. It’s his first-ever road car,” Palmer said.

Aston Martin DP-100 on the track

Above: Aston Martin’s virtual DP-100 concept, designed for the Vision Gran Turismo racing game

The hypercar is likened to the original McLaren F1 of the late 1990s, which was designed by another Formula One aerodynamic genius (Gordon Murray).

“[The McLaren] F1 is the closest I can get to, that Gordon Murray car is the closest I can imagine,” Palmer said.

Aston Martin will develop the car in just two short years, which Palmer says is enough time for a company the size of Aston Martin working closely with a Formula One team that is used to making half-a-dozen race cars per year. Meanwhile, the hypercar will not make use of any currently known Aston Martin technology or parts.


“Our car is a unique platform, unique engine, unique concept, we are not starting with anything we already have, [so we have] no burdens.”

Although the yet-to-be-named Aston Martin hypercar – which will be limited to fewer than 100 units – will be a pure Aston, Palmer admitted that it will likely wear Newey’s credit somewhere on the car.

“[It will] somewhere carry Adrian’s name in some way shape or form, it’s a pure Aston – Adrian is designing the aero surfaces.”

Aston Martin’s own head of design, Marek Reichman, will create the additional surfaces. Palmer insisted that it “has to look like an Aston but it has to be sublimely quick”.

So far the only image of the car is the sketch seen above, more details of the car and additional images are likely to surface over the course of the year.