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The Australian new vehicle market underwent strong growth in February this year over the same (albeit one-day shorter) month in 2015 with 96,443 registrations recorded, up 6.7 per cent.

The VFACTS figures released this morning by the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries show that last month was Australia’s highest February on record. It also takes cumulative annual growth to almost 5 per cent over last year’s record.

This was driven by big growth in Australia’s most populated state, New South Wales, which grew 12.6 per cent to 32,633. Victoria (26,782, up 8.2 per cent) and Queensland (18,711, up 2.7 per cent) also saw good growth. Western Australia again weakened.

Of the 96,443 vehicles sold in February, 41 per cent were passenger cars (down 4.1 share points), 38.2 per cent were SUVs (up 2.8), and 18.1 per cent were light commercials (up 1.0). The tipping point to where SUVs become the new default draws ever closer.

Volume growth for SUVs and light commercials was 15.1 per cent and 12.8 per cent respectively, with Medium SUVs and 4×4 utes doing the bulk of the driving.

See our statistical breakdown of February 2016 here.

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Top brands in February 2016

Toyota was, as always, the top selling brand in February 2016 with 16.8 per cent of the market and 16,191 sales. But the star was number one full importer Mazda, up 12.7 per cent to 10,205 units and 10.6 per cent share.

Next were Hyundai (7701, down 3.8 per cent), Holden (7340, down 6 per cent), Mitsubishi (6681, up 7 per cent), Ford (6656, up a strong 32.5 per cent), Nissan (5989, up 0.1 per cent), Volkswagen (4922, up 0.7 per cent), Subaru (3538, up 9.8 per cent) and Honda (3279, up 13 per cent).

The tier two brands outside the top ten were Mercedes-Benz (3236, up 17.9 per cent), Kia (3067, up 21.4 per cent), BMW (2748, up a massive 51.7 per cent), Audi (2007, up 18.1 per cent) and Isuzu Ute (1719, up 15.4 per cent).

Smaller brands that won for the month (alphabetically) were: Citroen (106, up 32.5 per cent), Ferrari (19, up 35.7 per cent), Fiat Professional vans (120, up 66.7 per cent), Jaguar (242, up 191.6 per cent), Lamborghini (9, up 50 per cent) and Land Rover/Range Rover (1374, up 64.2 per cent).

Others included: LDV (131, up 274 per cent), Lexus (816, up 29.5 per cent), Mini (310, up 34.2 per cent), Porsche (536, up a huge 144.7 per cent), Rolls-Royce (4, up 300 per cent), Suzuki (1674, up 12.3 per cent) and Volvo Car (478, up 59.3 per cent).

Losers for February included: Alfa Romeo (85, down 53.1 per cent), Aston Martin (9, down 40 per cent), Chrysler (51, down 34.6 per cent), Dodge (56, down 44.6 per cent), Fiat (254, down 35.7 per cent), Jeep (1378, down 42.1 per cent), Peugeot (338, down 16.5 per cent), Proton (23, down 17.9 per cent), Renault (654, down 12.7 per cent) and SsangYong (59, down 39.8 per cent).

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Top models in February 2016

The Toyota Corolla was (not atypically) the most popular vehicle in February with 3455 sales, albeit down 12.3 per cent, ahead of the Mazda 3 (3354, down 6.8 per cent). This means the top two were from the Small Car segment, despite its 4.9 per cent decline.

The Toyota HiLux (3261, up 14 per cent) and Ford Ranger (2655, up 35.9 per cent) utes filled the next two spots, ahead of the always strong Hyundai i30 (2461, up 15.8 per cent).

Rounding out the top ten were the Holden Commodore (2331, down 7.4 per cent), Mitsubishi Triton (2165, up 8.9 per cent), Mazda CX-5 (2156, up 3.4 per cent), Hyundai Tucson (1849) and Volkswagen Golf (1752, down 0.7 per cent).

The top-selling vehicle in each passenger segment was: Nissan Micra, Mazda 2, Mini, Toyota Corolla, Audi A3, Toyota Camry, BMW 3 Series (first time we’ve seen that in a while), Holden Commodore, Jaguar XF, Holden Caprice, Mercedes-Benz S-Class, Kia Carnival, Mercedes-Benz Valente, Ford Mustang, BMW 4 Series and Porsche 911.

The top SUV and light commercial vehicles by segment were: Mitsubishi ASX, Audi Q3, Mazda CX-5, Mercedes-Benz GLC, Toyota Prado, BMW X5, Toyota LandCruiser, Mercedes-Benz GL-Class, Volkswagen Caddy, Hyundai iLoad and Toyota HiLux.

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Other key data

The five most popular vehicle types were small cars (19.1 per cent total market share), medium SUVs (15), large SUVs (12.3), 4×4 utes (12.2) and small SUVs (9.9).

The leading passenger vehicle brands were: Toyota (6763), Mazda (5610), Hyundai (4771), Holden (4152), Volkswagen (3054), Kia (2096), Ford (1930), Mercedes-Benz (1576), Honda (1385) and BMW (1279).

The leading SUV brands were Toyota (4869), Nissan (3735), Mazda (3712), Mitsubishi (3516), Subaru (2534), Hyundai (2282), Honda (1894), Ford (1696), Holden (1529) and BMW (1469)

Private (up 1.1 per cent), business (up 15.6 per cent) and government (1.9 per cent) sales all grew in February, with only rentals (down 0.6 per cent) going the other way.

Australia’s biggest sources of imports were Japan (28,138), Thailand (22,325), Korea (9699, up 4.9 per cent), Korea (11,576) and Germany (7322), all of which accounted for more sales than Australian-made (6493).

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Top makes for February 2016

  1. Toyota — 16,191 (down 0.3 per cent)
  2. Mazda — 10,205 (up 12.7 per cent)
  3. Hyundai — 7701 (down 3.8 per cent)
  4. Holden — 7340 (down 6 per cent)
  5. Mitsubishi — 6681 (up 7 per cent)
  6. Ford — 6656 (up 32.5 per cent)
  7. Nissan — 5989 (up 0.1 per cent)
  8. Volkswagen — 4922 (up 0.7 per cent)
  9. Subaru — 3538 (up 9.8 per cent)
  10. Honda — 3279 (up 13 per cent)

Top models for February 2016

  1. Toyota Corolla — 3455 (down 12.3 per cent)
  2. Mazda 3 — 3354 (down 6.8 per cent)
  3. Toyota HiLux — 3261 (up 14 per cent)
  4. Ford Ranger — 2655 (up 35.9 per cent)
  5. Hyundai i30 — 2461 (up 15.8 per cent)
  6. Holden Commodore — 2331 (down 7.4 per cent)
  7. Mitsubishi Triton — 2165 (up 8.9 per cent)
  8. Mazda CX-5 — 2156 (up 3.4 per cent)
  9. Hyundai Tucson — 1849 (new to market)
  10. Volkswagen Golf 1752 (down 0.7 per cent)

Segment-by-segment breakdown:

 Micro (664):
  1. Nissan Micra (229 – 34.5%)
  2. Mitsubishi Mirage (179 – 27%)
  3. Fiat 500 / Abarth (149 – 22.4%)

Light under $25K (7804):

  1. Mazda 2 (1257 – 16.1%)
  2. Toyota Yaris (1198 – 15.4%)
  3. Hyundai Accent (1081 – 13.9%)

Light over $25K (450):

  1. Mini Hatch (219 – 41.2%)
  2. Audi A1 (124 – 27.6%)
  3. Peugeot 208 (71 – 15.8%)

Small under $40K (16,734):

  1. Toyota Corolla (3455 – 20.6%)
  2. Mazda 3 (3354 – 20%)
  3. Hyundai i30 (2461 – 14.7%)

Small over $40K (1700):

  1. Audi A3 (488 – 28.7%)
  2. Mercedes-Benz A-Class (458 – 26.9%)
  3. BMW 1 Series (296 – 17.4%)

Medium under $60K (3484):

  1. Toyota Camry (1457 – 41.8%)
  2. Ford Mondeo (409 – 11.7%)
  3. Mazda 6 (404 – 11.6%)

Medium over $60K (1936):

  1. BMW 3 Series (403 – 20.8%)
  2. Mercedes-Benz CLA (346 – 17.9%)
  3. Mercedes-Benz C-Class (344 – 17.8%)

Large under $70K (2933):

  1. Holden Commodore (2331 – 79.5%)
  2. Ford Falcon (421 – 14.4%)
  3. Toyota Aurion (145 – 4.9%)

Large over $70K (331):

  1. Jaguar XF (75 – 22.7%)
  2. Audi A6 (65 -19.6%)
  3. Mercedes-Benz E-Class (63 – 19%)

Upper Large under $100K (147):

  1. Holden Caprice (97 – 66%)
  2. Chrysler 300 (50 – 34%)

Upper Large above $100K (72):

  1. Mercedes-Benz S-Class (28 – 38.9%)
  2. BMW 7 Series (22 – 30.6%)
  3. Maserati Quattroporte (6 – 8.3%)

People-movers under $60K (1104):

  1. Kia Carnival (465 – 42.1%)
  2. Honda Odyssey (231 – 20.9%)
  3. Hyundai iMax (171 – 15.5%)

People-movers over $60K (57):

  1. Mercedes-Benz Valente (38 – 66.7%)
  2. Mercedes-Benz V-Class (36 – 31.6%)

Sports under $80K (1548):

  1. Ford Mustang (356 – 23%)
  2. Toyota 86 (246 – 15.9%)
  3. Mazda MX-5 (209 – 13.5%)

Sports over $80K (470):

  1. BMW 4 Series (141 – 30%)
  2. Audi TT (59 – 12.6%)
  3. Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe/Conv (55 – 11.7% )

Sports over $200K (124):

  1. Porsche 911 (31 – 25%)
  2. Ferrari Coupe/Convertible (19 – 15.3%)
  3. Mercedes-AMG GT (16 – 12.9%)

SUV Small under $40K (8395):

  1. Mitsubishi ASX (1621 – 19.3%)
  2. Mazda CX-3 (1381 – 16.5%)
  3. Honda HRV (1152 – 13.7%)

SUV Small over $40K (1196):

  1. Audi Q3 (469 – 39.2%)
  2. BMW X1 (374 – 31.3%)
  3. Mercedes-Benz GLA (297 – 24.8%)

SUV Medium under $60K (11,735):

  1. Mazda CX-5 (2156 – 18.4%)
  2. Hyundai Tucson (1849 – 15.8%)
  3. Nissan X-Trail (1669 – 14.2%)

SUV Medium over $60K (2715):

  1. Mercedes-Benz GLC (536 – 19.7%)
  2. Land Rover Discovery Sport (431 – 15.9%)
  3. BMW X3 (394 – 14.5%)

SUV Large under $70K (9595):

  1. Toyota Prado (1295 – 13.5%)
  2. Toyota Kluger (959 – 10%)
  3. Subaru Outback (869 – 9.1%)

SUV Large over $70K (2223):

  1. BMW X5 (451 – 20.3%)
  2. Land Rover Discovery (319 – 14.3%)
  3. Mercedes-Benz GLE Class (251 – 11.3%)

SUV Upper Large under $100K (855):

  1. Toyota LandCruiser (679 – 79.4%)
  2. Nissan Patrol (176 – 20.6%)

SUV Upper Large over $100K (151):

  1. Mercedes-Benz GL-Class (80 – 53%)
  2. Range Rover (35 – 23.2%)
  3. Lexus LX (20 – 13.2%)

Light Vans (235):

  1. Volkswagen Caddy Van (105 – 44.7%)
  2. Renault Kangoo (39 – 16.6%)
  3. Suzuki APV / Citroen Berlingo (36 – 15.3%)

Medium Vans (1718):

  1. Hyundai iLoad (648 – 37.7%)
  2. Toyota HiAce (566 – 32.9%)
  3. Renault Trafic (113 – 6.6%)

4×2 utes (3479):

  1. Toyota HiLux (901 – 25.9%)
  2. Ford Ranger (480 – 13.8%)
  3. Mazda BT-50 (423 – 12.2%)

4×4 utes (11,806):

  1. Toyota HiLux (2360 – 20%)
  2. Ford Ranger (2175 – 18.4%)
  3. Mitsubishi Triton (1895 – 16.1%)

MORE: All CarAdvice articles tagged with ‘VFACTS’




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