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A recall announcement for around 77,000 Volkswagen vehicles sold in Australia is imminent, according to Volkswagen Australia.

The recall announcement will impact all vehicles fitted with the two affected Volkswagen EA189 engines: the 1.6- and 2.0-litre turbocharged diesel EA189 Volkswagen Group powerplants.

“There’s no effect on performance, fuel consumption, torque, any of that,” said Volkswagen Australia public relations manager Kurt McGuiness.


“Amarok will be the first car to go, followed by Passat and then we’ll work through the models from there.”

The fix is a single-stage software update for the 2.0-litre engine. This software update removes the ‘dieselgate’ code that allowed the vehicle to cheat emissions testing under certain circumstances. The removal of this code has no effect on vehicle performance or emissions.

The 1.6-litre engine requires the same software update, but additionally requires an air flow device that sits between the air filter and air flow meter. This device allows air to travel freely between the two, where previously it was being baffled, which resulted in inaccurate readings.

This process is expected to take around two hours, which includes the software update.


“There are two engines on offer in our market that are affected — the 1.6-litre and the 2.0-litre. The 2.0-litre is a software update, that’s it, it takes about half-an-hour. With the 1.6, it’s a software update and the addition of a filter and that takes about an hour,” McGuinness said.

“In terms of the fix, it’s an update to the software. It’s just changing some parameters.”

Volkswagen Australia needed to jump through several regulatory hoops before the recall would be approved, with the process requiring approval from both local authorities and the German government agencies.

“It goes to the regulator [locally]. It’s the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development. Basically we’ve provided all the necessary information — it has also been signed off by the KBA, which is the regulator in Germany,” said McGuinness.

MORE: all Dieselgate news coverage
MORE: How to check if your vehicle is affected